5.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/581960
Title:
Doing more with less? work and wellbeing in academics
Authors:
Kinman, Gail ( 0000-0002-0130-1708 )
Abstract:
There is evidence that fundamental changes to the context and content of academic work have increased demands, reduced support and eroded professional autonomy. Drawing on research conducted in the UK and Australia, this paper initially considers the implications of these changes for the wellbeing of academics. Particular focus is placed on a longitudinal programme of research that has utilised the UK Health and Safety Executive's Management Standards Framework to investigate the job-related stressors and strains experienced in the university sector. It is argued that this benchmarking approach has strong potential to monitor working conditions in universities over time, facilitate comparisons with the work-related wellbeing of other occupational groups, and identify priority areas for intervention. The paper also focuses on the antecedents and outcomes of work-life conflict which is particularly prevalent amongst academics and a key source of strain. Finally, ways in which the wellbeing of academic employees may be enhanced are considered. The need for universities to provide active and visible support to monitor the wellbeing of their employees and take necessary action is emphasised.
Citation:
Kinman, G. (2014) 'Doing more with less? Work and wellbeing in academics'. Somatechnics, vol 4 (2) pp219-235
Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
Journal:
Somatechnics
Issue Date:
Sep-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/581960
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/soma.2014.0129
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2044-0138
Appears in Collections:
Research Centre for Applied Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-09T13:02:19Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-09T13:02:19Zen
dc.date.issued2014-09en
dc.identifier.citationKinman, G. (2014) 'Doing more with less? Work and wellbeing in academics'. Somatechnics, vol 4 (2) pp219-235en
dc.identifier.issn2044-0138en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/581960en
dc.description.abstractThere is evidence that fundamental changes to the context and content of academic work have increased demands, reduced support and eroded professional autonomy. Drawing on research conducted in the UK and Australia, this paper initially considers the implications of these changes for the wellbeing of academics. Particular focus is placed on a longitudinal programme of research that has utilised the UK Health and Safety Executive's Management Standards Framework to investigate the job-related stressors and strains experienced in the university sector. It is argued that this benchmarking approach has strong potential to monitor working conditions in universities over time, facilitate comparisons with the work-related wellbeing of other occupational groups, and identify priority areas for intervention. The paper also focuses on the antecedents and outcomes of work-life conflict which is particularly prevalent amongst academics and a key source of strain. Finally, ways in which the wellbeing of academic employees may be enhanced are considered. The need for universities to provide active and visible support to monitor the wellbeing of their employees and take necessary action is emphasised.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEdinburgh University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3366/soma.2014.0129en
dc.subjectwork-related stressen
dc.subjectwellbeingen
dc.subjectwork-life balanceen
dc.subjectacademicsen
dc.titleDoing more with less? work and wellbeing in academicsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalSomatechnicsen
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