What's all this talk about emotion? developing emotional intelligence in social work students

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/581941
Title:
What's all this talk about emotion? developing emotional intelligence in social work students
Authors:
Grant, Louise Jane; Kinman, Gail ( 0000-0002-0130-1708 ) ; Alexander, Kelly
Abstract:
The capacity to manage emotional reactions effectively, frequently in complex care settings, is central to the role of a social worker. Nonetheless, there is evidence that social work students frequently find their placements emotionally demanding and stressful. It is proposed that emotional intelligence may help students manage their emotional reactions more effectively during placements and their subsequent career. To date, however, little systematic research has explored whether emotional intelligence and associated competencies can be enhanced during social work training and the implications for wellbeing. This paper presents a mixed-methods two-stage study which aimed to increase emotional competencies in social work students during the first year of training. More specifically, it assesses the impact of a workshop designed to enhance emotional competencies and an emotional writing task on levels of emotional intelligence, reflective ability and empathy which were assessed via questionnaire and reflective logs pre- and post-intervention (Times 1 and 2). Levels of reflective ability and empathy increased significantly between Times 1 and 2 and psychological distress decreased. Content analysis of reflective logs found evidence that reflective ability, empathy and emotional intelligence were enhanced following the interventions. The implications of the findings for the development of the curriculum are considered.
Citation:
Grant, L., Kinman, G. & Alexander, K. (2014). 'What's All this Talk About Emotion? Developing Emotional Intelligence in Social Work Students' Social Work Education, Vol 33 (7) pp874-889
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Journal:
Social Work Education
Issue Date:
4-Mar-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/581941
DOI:
10.1080/02615479.2014.891012
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02615479.2014.891012
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0261-5479; 1470-1227
Appears in Collections:
Research Centre for Applied Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Louise Janeen
dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Kellyen
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-09T13:21:10Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-09T13:21:10Zen
dc.date.issued2014-03-04en
dc.identifier.citationGrant, L., Kinman, G. & Alexander, K. (2014). 'What's All this Talk About Emotion? Developing Emotional Intelligence in Social Work Students' Social Work Education, Vol 33 (7) pp874-889en
dc.identifier.issn0261-5479en
dc.identifier.issn1470-1227en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02615479.2014.891012en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/581941en
dc.description.abstractThe capacity to manage emotional reactions effectively, frequently in complex care settings, is central to the role of a social worker. Nonetheless, there is evidence that social work students frequently find their placements emotionally demanding and stressful. It is proposed that emotional intelligence may help students manage their emotional reactions more effectively during placements and their subsequent career. To date, however, little systematic research has explored whether emotional intelligence and associated competencies can be enhanced during social work training and the implications for wellbeing. This paper presents a mixed-methods two-stage study which aimed to increase emotional competencies in social work students during the first year of training. More specifically, it assesses the impact of a workshop designed to enhance emotional competencies and an emotional writing task on levels of emotional intelligence, reflective ability and empathy which were assessed via questionnaire and reflective logs pre- and post-intervention (Times 1 and 2). Levels of reflective ability and empathy increased significantly between Times 1 and 2 and psychological distress decreased. Content analysis of reflective logs found evidence that reflective ability, empathy and emotional intelligence were enhanced following the interventions. The implications of the findings for the development of the curriculum are considered.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02615479.2014.891012en
dc.subjectreflectionen
dc.subjectresilienceen
dc.subjectemotional intelligenceen
dc.subjectsocial worken
dc.subjectstudentsen
dc.subjectteachingen
dc.titleWhat's all this talk about emotion? developing emotional intelligence in social work studentsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalSocial Work Educationen
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