An examination of gender differences in the impact of individual and organisational factors on work hours, work-life conflict and psychological strain in academics

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/581939
Title:
An examination of gender differences in the impact of individual and organisational factors on work hours, work-life conflict and psychological strain in academics
Authors:
Hogan, Victoria; Hogan, Michael; Hodgins, Margaret; Kinman, Gail; Bunting, Brendan
Abstract:
The current study used multi-group structural equation modelling (SEM) to test a fully and partially mediated Extended Rational Model of Work-Life Conflict and examine the impact of job involvement, workaholism, work intensity, organisational expectations and support, and having children on work hours, work-life conflict and psychological strain in male and female academics. In total, 410 academics from three Irish universities completed an electronic questionnaire survey. Results indicated both commonalities and differences in the factors that influence work hours, work-life conflict and levels of psychological strain in men and women. Lower organisation expectations predicted longer working hours in both men and women; additional unique predictors of longer working hours in men were higher work intensity and having children; conversely, higher work enjoyment predicted longer working hours in women, but not men. Higher work intensity predicted higher work-life conflict in men and women. In the final best fitting model, longer work hours predicted higher levels of work-life conflict in women only. Findings are discussed in light of research and theory on work-life balance and the challenge of facilitating productivity and well-being in academia.
Citation:
Hogan, H., Hogan, M., Hodgins, M., Kinman, G., Bunting, B. (2015) An examination of gender differences in the impact of individual and organisational factors on work hours, work-life conflict and psychological strain in academics. Irish Journal of Psychology 35 (2-3) pp133-150
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Journal:
The Irish Journal of Psychology
Issue Date:
30-Apr-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/581939
DOI:
10.1080/03033910.2015.1011193
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03033910.2015.1011193
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0303-3910; 2158-0812
Appears in Collections:
Research Centre for Applied Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHogan, Victoriaen
dc.contributor.authorHogan, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorHodgins, Margareten
dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen
dc.contributor.authorBunting, Brendanen
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-09T12:58:11Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-09T12:58:11Zen
dc.date.issued2015-04-30en
dc.identifier.citationHogan, H., Hogan, M., Hodgins, M., Kinman, G., Bunting, B. (2015) An examination of gender differences in the impact of individual and organisational factors on work hours, work-life conflict and psychological strain in academics. Irish Journal of Psychology 35 (2-3) pp133-150en
dc.identifier.issn0303-3910en
dc.identifier.issn2158-0812en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03033910.2015.1011193en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/581939en
dc.description.abstractThe current study used multi-group structural equation modelling (SEM) to test a fully and partially mediated Extended Rational Model of Work-Life Conflict and examine the impact of job involvement, workaholism, work intensity, organisational expectations and support, and having children on work hours, work-life conflict and psychological strain in male and female academics. In total, 410 academics from three Irish universities completed an electronic questionnaire survey. Results indicated both commonalities and differences in the factors that influence work hours, work-life conflict and levels of psychological strain in men and women. Lower organisation expectations predicted longer working hours in both men and women; additional unique predictors of longer working hours in men were higher work intensity and having children; conversely, higher work enjoyment predicted longer working hours in women, but not men. Higher work intensity predicted higher work-life conflict in men and women. In the final best fitting model, longer work hours predicted higher levels of work-life conflict in women only. Findings are discussed in light of research and theory on work-life balance and the challenge of facilitating productivity and well-being in academia.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03033910.2015.1011193en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Irish Journal of Psychologyen
dc.subjectwork hoursen
dc.subjectwork-life conflicten
dc.subjectgenderen
dc.subjectacademiaen
dc.titleAn examination of gender differences in the impact of individual and organisational factors on work hours, work-life conflict and psychological strain in academicsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalThe Irish Journal of Psychologyen
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.