Is there a need to identify novel tumour antigens as targets for immunotherapy clinical trials for the removal of minimal residual disease in haematological malignancies?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/578850
Title:
Is there a need to identify novel tumour antigens as targets for immunotherapy clinical trials for the removal of minimal residual disease in haematological malignancies?
Authors:
Guinn, Barbara-Ann
Abstract:
Despite the identification of many tumour antigens with the potential to act as targets for cancer vaccines and/or T-cell therapies very few have been used in clinical trials to date. This led to the timely development of a criteria which identified the ideal characteristics of tumour antigens which should be actively pursued for use in immunotherapy clinical trials. A list of 75 antigens were assessed against these criteria and although none harboured all of the characteristics identified as desirable, a number did show many of the characteristics identifying them as worthy of further pursuit to enable an organised development towards immunotherapy clinical trials. The study highlighted the benefit of focussing on a short list of antigens which would enable the rapid progress of a smaller number of antigens into clinical trials as targets for immunotherapy. However the antigens expressed by solid tumours often differ to those expressed by haematological malignancies, leading to this editorial which states the need for a similar study prioritising tumour antigens for use in clinical trials of haematological malignancies, independently of solid tumours. We also debate the importance of looking for new antigens in cancers in which few targets are known and discuss the importance of tumour antigens as biomarkers of disease diagnosis, stage and survival.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Guinn, B.A. (2015) 'Is there a need to identify novel tumour antigens as targets for immunotherapy clinical trials for the removal of minimal residual disease in haematological malignancies?' Invited submission. International Journal for Haematological Research, 1, pp24-26.
Publisher:
ACT Publishing Group
Journal:
International journal of hematology research
Issue Date:
Jul-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/578850
Additional Links:
http://www.ghrnet.org/index.php/ijhr/article/view/1070/1411
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2409-3548
Appears in Collections:
Biomedicine and Nutrition Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGuinn, Barbara-Annen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-29T07:46:14Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-29T07:46:14Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07en
dc.identifier.citationGuinn, B.A. (2015) 'Is there a need to identify novel tumour antigens as targets for immunotherapy clinical trials for the removal of minimal residual disease in haematological malignancies?' Invited submission. International Journal for Haematological Research, 1, pp24-26.en
dc.identifier.issn2409-3548en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/578850en
dc.description.abstractDespite the identification of many tumour antigens with the potential to act as targets for cancer vaccines and/or T-cell therapies very few have been used in clinical trials to date. This led to the timely development of a criteria which identified the ideal characteristics of tumour antigens which should be actively pursued for use in immunotherapy clinical trials. A list of 75 antigens were assessed against these criteria and although none harboured all of the characteristics identified as desirable, a number did show many of the characteristics identifying them as worthy of further pursuit to enable an organised development towards immunotherapy clinical trials. The study highlighted the benefit of focussing on a short list of antigens which would enable the rapid progress of a smaller number of antigens into clinical trials as targets for immunotherapy. However the antigens expressed by solid tumours often differ to those expressed by haematological malignancies, leading to this editorial which states the need for a similar study prioritising tumour antigens for use in clinical trials of haematological malignancies, independently of solid tumours. We also debate the importance of looking for new antigens in cancers in which few targets are known and discuss the importance of tumour antigens as biomarkers of disease diagnosis, stage and survival.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherACT Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ghrnet.org/index.php/ijhr/article/view/1070/1411en
dc.subjecttumour antigensen
dc.subjectimmunotherapyen
dc.subjectclinical trialsen
dc.subjectminimal residual diseaseen
dc.subjecthaematologocial malignanciesen
dc.subjectleukaemiaen
dc.titleIs there a need to identify novel tumour antigens as targets for immunotherapy clinical trials for the removal of minimal residual disease in haematological malignancies?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of hematology researchen
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