Effects of exercise intensity on salivary antimicrobial proteins and markers of stress in active men

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/578572
Title:
Effects of exercise intensity on salivary antimicrobial proteins and markers of stress in active men
Authors:
Allgrove, Judith E.; Gomes, Elisa; Hough, John P.; Gleeson, Michael
Abstract:
In the present study, we assessed the effects of exercise intensity on salivary immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) and salivary lysozyme (s-Lys) and examined how these responses were associated with salivary markers of adrenal activation. Using a randomized design, 10 healthy active men participated in three experimental cycling trials: 50% maximal oxygen uptake ([Vdot]O2max), 75%[Vdot]O2max, and an incremental test to exhaustion. The durations of the trials were the same as for a preliminary incremental test to exhaustion (22.3 min, s x = 0.8). Timed, unstimulated saliva samples were collected before exercise, immediately after exercise, and 1 h after exercise. In the incremental exhaustion trial, the secretion rates of both s-IgA and s-Lys were increased. An increase in s-Lys secretion rate was also observed at 75%[Vdot]O2max. No significant changes in saliva flow rate were observed in any trial. Cycling at 75%[Vdot]O2max and to exhaustion increased the secretion of α-amylase and chromogranin A immediately after exercise; higher cortisol values at 75%[Vdot]O2max and in the incremental exhaustion trial compared with 50%[Vdot]O2max were observed 1 h immediately after exercise only. These findings suggest that short-duration, high-intensity exercise increases the secretion rate of s-IgA and s-Lys despite no change in the saliva flow rate. These effects appear to be associated with changes in sympathetic activity and not the hypothalamic – pituitary – adrenal axis.
Affiliation:
Loughborough University
Citation:
Allgrove, J.E., Gomes, E., Hough, J., Gleeson, M. (2008) 'Effects of exercise intensity on salivary antimicrobial proteins and markers of stress in active men' Journal of Sports Sciences 26 (6):653
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Journal of Sports Sciences
Issue Date:
Apr-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/578572
DOI:
10.1080/02640410701716790
PubMed ID:
18344136
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02640410701716790
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0264-0414; 1466-447X
Appears in Collections:
Applied Sport and Exercise Physiology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAllgrove, Judith E.en
dc.contributor.authorGomes, Elisaen
dc.contributor.authorHough, John P.en
dc.contributor.authorGleeson, Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-22T08:40:58Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-22T08:40:58Zen
dc.date.issued2008-04en
dc.identifier.citationAllgrove, J.E., Gomes, E., Hough, J., Gleeson, M. (2008) 'Effects of exercise intensity on salivary antimicrobial proteins and markers of stress in active men' Journal of Sports Sciences 26 (6):653en
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414en
dc.identifier.issn1466-447Xen
dc.identifier.pmid18344136-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02640410701716790en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/578572en
dc.description.abstractIn the present study, we assessed the effects of exercise intensity on salivary immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) and salivary lysozyme (s-Lys) and examined how these responses were associated with salivary markers of adrenal activation. Using a randomized design, 10 healthy active men participated in three experimental cycling trials: 50% maximal oxygen uptake ([Vdot]O2max), 75%[Vdot]O2max, and an incremental test to exhaustion. The durations of the trials were the same as for a preliminary incremental test to exhaustion (22.3 min, s x = 0.8). Timed, unstimulated saliva samples were collected before exercise, immediately after exercise, and 1 h after exercise. In the incremental exhaustion trial, the secretion rates of both s-IgA and s-Lys were increased. An increase in s-Lys secretion rate was also observed at 75%[Vdot]O2max. No significant changes in saliva flow rate were observed in any trial. Cycling at 75%[Vdot]O2max and to exhaustion increased the secretion of α-amylase and chromogranin A immediately after exercise; higher cortisol values at 75%[Vdot]O2max and in the incremental exhaustion trial compared with 50%[Vdot]O2max were observed 1 h immediately after exercise only. These findings suggest that short-duration, high-intensity exercise increases the secretion rate of s-IgA and s-Lys despite no change in the saliva flow rate. These effects appear to be associated with changes in sympathetic activity and not the hypothalamic – pituitary – adrenal axis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02640410701716790en
dc.subjectsaliva flow rateen
dc.subjectimmunoglobulin Aen
dc.subjectlysozymeen
dc.subjectchromogranin Aen
dc.subjectexercise intensityen
dc.subjectsports scienceen
dc.subjectstressen
dc.titleEffects of exercise intensity on salivary antimicrobial proteins and markers of stress in active menen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLoughborough Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sports Sciencesen

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