2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/577078
Title:
'Zero Dark Thirty' – ‘war autism’ or a Lacanian ethical act?
Authors:
Piotrowska, Agnieszka
Abstract:
The paper discusses Kathryn Bigelow's Zero Dark Thirty (2012) through the lens of Lacanian ethics as described in Seminar VII. I argue that Maya's single-minded determination is akin to that of Sophocles' Antigone as presented by Lacan. In particular in her decision to see through her commitment to a cause ‘beyond the limit’ as Lacan would put it, she echoes Antigone's ‘inflexibility’ and even her ‘monstrous’ unfeminine and ‘raw’ stubbornness to her mission. This stance, however, is different from a lack of empathy suggested by some critics and scholars. Instead, it constitutes an ethical act within the Lacanian paradigm. I argue that Maya's gender and her feminine beauty defiant in the world of patriarchal procedures also resonates with the position of Antigone. I claim further that psychoanalysis in its emphasis on the unknowingness of subjects and situations has still a lot to offer to film studies, beyond its post-1968 structuralist readings.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Piotrowska, A (2014) 'Zero Dark Thirty – ‘war autism’ or a Lacanian ethical act?' New Review of Film and Television Studies 12 (2) pp.143-155
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
New Review of Film and Television Studies
Issue Date:
9-May-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/577078
DOI:
10.1080/17400309.2014.908269
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17400309.2014.908269
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1740-0309; 1740-7923
Appears in Collections:
Screen and Script: cross-media practices

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPiotrowska, Agnieszkaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-10T12:30:52Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-10T12:30:52Zen
dc.date.issued2014-05-09en
dc.identifier.citationPiotrowska, A (2014) 'Zero Dark Thirty – ‘war autism’ or a Lacanian ethical act?' New Review of Film and Television Studies 12 (2) pp.143-155en
dc.identifier.issn1740-0309en
dc.identifier.issn1740-7923en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17400309.2014.908269en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/577078en
dc.description.abstractThe paper discusses Kathryn Bigelow's Zero Dark Thirty (2012) through the lens of Lacanian ethics as described in Seminar VII. I argue that Maya's single-minded determination is akin to that of Sophocles' Antigone as presented by Lacan. In particular in her decision to see through her commitment to a cause ‘beyond the limit’ as Lacan would put it, she echoes Antigone's ‘inflexibility’ and even her ‘monstrous’ unfeminine and ‘raw’ stubbornness to her mission. This stance, however, is different from a lack of empathy suggested by some critics and scholars. Instead, it constitutes an ethical act within the Lacanian paradigm. I argue that Maya's gender and her feminine beauty defiant in the world of patriarchal procedures also resonates with the position of Antigone. I claim further that psychoanalysis in its emphasis on the unknowingness of subjects and situations has still a lot to offer to film studies, beyond its post-1968 structuralist readings.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17400309.2014.908269en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to New Review of Film and Television Studiesen
dc.subjectZero Dark Thirtyen
dc.subjectAntigoneen
dc.subjectpsychoanalysisen
dc.subjectethicsen
dc.subjectLacanen
dc.title'Zero Dark Thirty' – ‘war autism’ or a Lacanian ethical act?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalNew Review of Film and Television Studiesen
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