A longitudinal examination of the relationship between perfectionism and motivational climate in dance

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/576792
Title:
A longitudinal examination of the relationship between perfectionism and motivational climate in dance
Authors:
Nordin-Bates, Sanna M.; Hill, Andrew P.; Cumming, Jennifer; Aujla, Imogen ( 0000-0002-1245-4670 ) ; Redding, Emma
Abstract:
The present study examined the relationship between dance-related perfectionism and perceptions of motivational climate in dance over time. In doing so, three possibilities were tested: (a) perfectionism affects perceptions of the motivational climate, (b) perceptions of the motivational climate affect perfectionism, and (c) the relationship is reciprocal. Two hundred seventy-one young dancers (M = 14.21 years old, SD = 1.96) from UK Centres for Advanced Training completed questionnaires twice, approximately 6 months apart. Cross-lagged analysis indicated that perfectionistic concerns led to increased perceptions of an ego-involving climate and decreased perceptions of a task-involving climate over time. In addition, perceptions of a task-involving climate led to increased perfectionistic strivings over time. The findings suggest that perfectionistic concerns may color perceptions of training/performing environments so that mistakes are deemed unacceptable and only superior performance is valued. They also suggest that perceptions of a task-involving climate in training/performing environments may encourage striving for excellence and perfection without promoting excessive concerns regarding their attainment.
Citation:
Nordin-Bates, S.M., Hill, A., Cumming, J., Aujla, I.J., & Redding, E. (2014) 'A Longitudinal Examination of the Relationship Between Perfectionism and Motivational Climate in Dance'. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology 36 (4) pp382-391
Publisher:
Human Kinetics
Journal:
Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Issue Date:
1-Aug-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/576792
DOI:
10.1123/jsep.2013-0245
Additional Links:
http://journals.humankinetics.com/jsep-back-issues/jsep-volume-36-issue-4-august/a-longitudinal-examination-of-the-relationship-between-perfectionism-and-motivational-climate-in-dance
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0895-2779
Sponsors:
The Leverhulme Trust and the UK Department for Education.
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Applied Research in Dance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNordin-Bates, Sanna M.en
dc.contributor.authorHill, Andrew P.en
dc.contributor.authorCumming, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorAujla, Imogenen
dc.contributor.authorRedding, Emmaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-04T09:20:46Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-04T09:20:46Zen
dc.date.issued2014-08-01en
dc.identifier.citationNordin-Bates, S.M., Hill, A., Cumming, J., Aujla, I.J., & Redding, E. (2014) 'A Longitudinal Examination of the Relationship Between Perfectionism and Motivational Climate in Dance'. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology 36 (4) pp382-391en
dc.identifier.issn0895-2779en
dc.identifier.doi10.1123/jsep.2013-0245en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/576792en
dc.description.abstractThe present study examined the relationship between dance-related perfectionism and perceptions of motivational climate in dance over time. In doing so, three possibilities were tested: (a) perfectionism affects perceptions of the motivational climate, (b) perceptions of the motivational climate affect perfectionism, and (c) the relationship is reciprocal. Two hundred seventy-one young dancers (M = 14.21 years old, SD = 1.96) from UK Centres for Advanced Training completed questionnaires twice, approximately 6 months apart. Cross-lagged analysis indicated that perfectionistic concerns led to increased perceptions of an ego-involving climate and decreased perceptions of a task-involving climate over time. In addition, perceptions of a task-involving climate led to increased perfectionistic strivings over time. The findings suggest that perfectionistic concerns may color perceptions of training/performing environments so that mistakes are deemed unacceptable and only superior performance is valued. They also suggest that perceptions of a task-involving climate in training/performing environments may encourage striving for excellence and perfection without promoting excessive concerns regarding their attainment.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Leverhulme Trust and the UK Department for Education.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHuman Kineticsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.humankinetics.com/jsep-back-issues/jsep-volume-36-issue-4-august/a-longitudinal-examination-of-the-relationship-between-perfectionism-and-motivational-climate-in-danceen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychologyen
dc.subjectpsychologyen
dc.subjectsport psychologyen
dc.subjecttrainingen
dc.subjectmotivationen
dc.subjectperformanceen
dc.subjectdanceen
dc.subjectperfectionismen
dc.titleA longitudinal examination of the relationship between perfectionism and motivational climate in danceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sport and Exercise Psychologyen
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