How film education might best address the needs of UK film industry and film culture

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/575401
Title:
How film education might best address the needs of UK film industry and film culture
Authors:
Fox, Neil James
Abstract:
This thesis reveals and explores contemporary relationships between film education, film industry and film culture within a UK context through a series of interviews, data analysis, historical research and international case studies. It highlights what appear to be binary oppositions within film such as divisions between theory and practice, industry and academia or art and entertainment and interrogates how they have permeated film education to the point where the relationship between film studies and film practice is polemical. Also, the thesis investigates how a relationship between two binary areas might be re-­engaged and it is within this context that this thesis addresses contemporary issues within UK higher education and national provision of film education. There is detailed analysis of UK film policy alongside the philosophies and practicalities of filmmaking to establish how connected the practice of filmmaking is to the film industry and national strategy. An international perspective is provided through the analysis of the film school systems in Denmark and the U.S. and this postulates potential future directions for UK film education, particularly within the university sector. A main focus of the thesis is to question film education by engaging with the voices of actual filmmakers and also via data analysis of the educational background of filmmakers as a way of developing film education. The thesis is undertaken at a time of major changes across film and higher education. Film production, distribution and consumption have undergone major technological evolution and the structures that were once in place to facilitate graduate movement into the workplace are changing and shifting. Simultaneously the identity of the university as a place of skills training or critical development is under consistent scrutiny. With this in mind this thesis seeks to engage with the potential future for film education.
Citation:
Fox, N.J. (2014) 'How film education might best address the needs of UK film industry and film culture'. Professional Doctorate thesis. University of Bedfordshire.
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Issue Date:
Feb-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/575401
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Description:
A thesis submitted to the University of Bedfordshire in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Professional Doctorate.
Appears in Collections:
PhD e-theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFox, Neil Jamesen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-20T14:47:08Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-20T14:47:08Zen
dc.date.issued2014-02en
dc.identifier.citationFox, N.J. (2014) 'How film education might best address the needs of UK film industry and film culture'. Professional Doctorate thesis. University of Bedfordshire.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/575401en
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted to the University of Bedfordshire in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Professional Doctorate.en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis reveals and explores contemporary relationships between film education, film industry and film culture within a UK context through a series of interviews, data analysis, historical research and international case studies. It highlights what appear to be binary oppositions within film such as divisions between theory and practice, industry and academia or art and entertainment and interrogates how they have permeated film education to the point where the relationship between film studies and film practice is polemical. Also, the thesis investigates how a relationship between two binary areas might be re-­engaged and it is within this context that this thesis addresses contemporary issues within UK higher education and national provision of film education. There is detailed analysis of UK film policy alongside the philosophies and practicalities of filmmaking to establish how connected the practice of filmmaking is to the film industry and national strategy. An international perspective is provided through the analysis of the film school systems in Denmark and the U.S. and this postulates potential future directions for UK film education, particularly within the university sector. A main focus of the thesis is to question film education by engaging with the voices of actual filmmakers and also via data analysis of the educational background of filmmakers as a way of developing film education. The thesis is undertaken at a time of major changes across film and higher education. Film production, distribution and consumption have undergone major technological evolution and the structures that were once in place to facilitate graduate movement into the workplace are changing and shifting. Simultaneously the identity of the university as a place of skills training or critical development is under consistent scrutiny. With this in mind this thesis seeks to engage with the potential future for film education.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.subjectP303 Film studiesen
dc.subjectfilm industryen
dc.subjectfilm studiesen
dc.subjectfilm cultureen
dc.subjectfilm educationen
dc.titleHow film education might best address the needs of UK film industry and film cultureen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_GB
dc.type.qualificationlevelPhDen
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bedfordshireen
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