4.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/565025
Title:
Project management: practice-based learning at a UK university
Authors:
Philpott, Elly; Owen, David
Abstract:
The chapter evaluates Practice-Based Learning on a UK postgraduate course and proffers conceptual models and measures for the student practice-based experience. Improved understanding and experience is explored through the use of an in-depth case study of a practice-based unit on an MSc in Project Management. Data is collected through an exit survey of students which compares their understanding of hard and soft project management tools before and after completing a unit. Experience data is collected from the analysis of personal reflective reports. The results show a positive shift in understanding of hard and soft project management tools indicating significant value to the students. Supplementary value also comes in the form of teaching development, value to the clients and value to the university in terms of sustainable engagement and profile. Student experience of the unit was positive and negative. Positive experiences stem from good client communications, a motivated team and the buzz of a real project and lead to a perception of pride in outcomes and personal transferrable skills. Negative experiences stem from the lack of life experience, language difficulties, client unavailability, lack of Project Management knowledge and literature gaps which left students feeling ill-equipped to deal with the international group context. Negative experiences lead to stress and poor group development. Conceptual models for positive and negative experience are proposed. ‘Open Business Learning’ is introduced to distinguish Practice Based Learning in a business context. The study is based on a single simple case and has no statistical validity externally but is nonetheless based on a sound methodology which has sought to reduce problems with internal validity, reliability and bias. There is a balance to be sought between providing a positive student experience and practical learning. Practice-Based Learning may add significant value to the student in terms of improved understanding of hard and soft tools, but may need to be based upon positive and negative experience. We should be mindful of striving for a solely positive student experience if it is at the cost of more valuable learning.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Philpott, E. and Owen, D. (2016) "Project management: practice-based learning at a UK university" in "Integrating curricular and co-curricular endeavors to enhance student outcomes", (Eds) Wankel, C and Wankel, L., Emerald Publishing, Bingley, UK
Publisher:
Emerald
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/565025
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Business and Information Systems Research Centre (BISC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPhilpott, Ellyen
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-04T09:52:23Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-04T09:52:23Zen
dc.date.issued2016en
dc.identifier.citationPhilpott, E. and Owen, D. (2016) "Project management: practice-based learning at a UK university" in "Integrating curricular and co-curricular endeavors to enhance student outcomes", (Eds) Wankel, C and Wankel, L., Emerald Publishing, Bingley, UKen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/565025en
dc.description.abstractThe chapter evaluates Practice-Based Learning on a UK postgraduate course and proffers conceptual models and measures for the student practice-based experience. Improved understanding and experience is explored through the use of an in-depth case study of a practice-based unit on an MSc in Project Management. Data is collected through an exit survey of students which compares their understanding of hard and soft project management tools before and after completing a unit. Experience data is collected from the analysis of personal reflective reports. The results show a positive shift in understanding of hard and soft project management tools indicating significant value to the students. Supplementary value also comes in the form of teaching development, value to the clients and value to the university in terms of sustainable engagement and profile. Student experience of the unit was positive and negative. Positive experiences stem from good client communications, a motivated team and the buzz of a real project and lead to a perception of pride in outcomes and personal transferrable skills. Negative experiences stem from the lack of life experience, language difficulties, client unavailability, lack of Project Management knowledge and literature gaps which left students feeling ill-equipped to deal with the international group context. Negative experiences lead to stress and poor group development. Conceptual models for positive and negative experience are proposed. ‘Open Business Learning’ is introduced to distinguish Practice Based Learning in a business context. The study is based on a single simple case and has no statistical validity externally but is nonetheless based on a sound methodology which has sought to reduce problems with internal validity, reliability and bias. There is a balance to be sought between providing a positive student experience and practical learning. Practice-Based Learning may add significant value to the student in terms of improved understanding of hard and soft tools, but may need to be based upon positive and negative experience. We should be mindful of striving for a solely positive student experience if it is at the cost of more valuable learning.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmeralden
dc.subjectN342 Academic studies in HEen
dc.subjectN213 Project Managementen
dc.titleProject management: practice-based learning at a UK universityen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
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