Reaping what you sow: how the University of Bedfordshire uses experienced Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) students to inspire and nurture future generations of PAL Leaders

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/558808
Title:
Reaping what you sow: how the University of Bedfordshire uses experienced Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) students to inspire and nurture future generations of PAL Leaders
Authors:
Rapley, Eve
Abstract:
The origins and value of university peer learning programmes have been subject to frequent exploration in academic literature during the last 20 years. Based on Deanna Martin’s (University of Missouri) 1970s model of Supplemental Instruction (SI) (Arendale, 1994), peer learning programmes operate using senior students (2nd/3rd year undergraduates) to facilitate and guide junior (first year) students. By providing a ‘safe’ environment where first year students can make mistakes and ask ‘stupid’ questions, experienced senior students can help to model successful student behaviours (Longfellow et al., 2008). They can also support new students as they begin to forge new identities to enable them to operate within a ‘specific learning milieu’ (Green, 2008). Perceived by new, junior students as being more approachable than members of staff, experienced senior students are usually well versed in the ways of knowing how to be successful in their courses (Field et al., 2007). Indeed, as suggested by Longfellow et al. (2008) experienced senior students are ‘expert at being students, and thus are arguably better placed to lead novice students towards becoming expert students’. Such students are able to act as facilitators in order to develop activities to enable new students to learn actively and collaboratively. Never a replacement for the lecturer, they guide students by mirroring the curriculum, as opposed to teaching the curriculum (Marra & Litzinger, 1997).
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Rapley, E. (2015) 'Reaping what you sow: how the University of Bedfordshire uses experienced Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) students to inspire and nurture future generations of PAL Leaders' Journal of pedagogic development 5 (2) 71
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Jul-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/558808
Additional Links:
https://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/172/251
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRapley, Eveen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-03T09:13:49Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-03T09:13:49Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07en
dc.identifier.citationRapley, E. (2015) 'Reaping what you sow: how the University of Bedfordshire uses experienced Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) students to inspire and nurture future generations of PAL Leaders' Journal of pedagogic development 5 (2) 71en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/558808en
dc.description.abstractThe origins and value of university peer learning programmes have been subject to frequent exploration in academic literature during the last 20 years. Based on Deanna Martin’s (University of Missouri) 1970s model of Supplemental Instruction (SI) (Arendale, 1994), peer learning programmes operate using senior students (2nd/3rd year undergraduates) to facilitate and guide junior (first year) students. By providing a ‘safe’ environment where first year students can make mistakes and ask ‘stupid’ questions, experienced senior students can help to model successful student behaviours (Longfellow et al., 2008). They can also support new students as they begin to forge new identities to enable them to operate within a ‘specific learning milieu’ (Green, 2008). Perceived by new, junior students as being more approachable than members of staff, experienced senior students are usually well versed in the ways of knowing how to be successful in their courses (Field et al., 2007). Indeed, as suggested by Longfellow et al. (2008) experienced senior students are ‘expert at being students, and thus are arguably better placed to lead novice students towards becoming expert students’. Such students are able to act as facilitators in order to develop activities to enable new students to learn actively and collaboratively. Never a replacement for the lecturer, they guide students by mirroring the curriculum, as opposed to teaching the curriculum (Marra & Litzinger, 1997).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/172/251en
dc.subjectpeer assisted learningen
dc.titleReaping what you sow: how the University of Bedfordshire uses experienced Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) students to inspire and nurture future generations of PAL Leadersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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