A study of urgent and emergency referrals from NHS Direct within England

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/558796
Title:
A study of urgent and emergency referrals from NHS Direct within England
Authors:
Cook, Erica Jane; Randhawa, Gurch ( 0000-0002-2289-5859 ) ; Large, Shirley; Guppy, Andy
Abstract:
Objectives: The presented study aimed to explore referral patterns of National Health Service (NHS) Direct to determine how patients engage with telephone-based healthcare and how telephone-healthcare can manage urgent and emergency care. Setting: NHS Direct, England, UK Participants: NHS Direct anonymised call data (N=1 415 472) were extracted over a 1-year period, during the combined month July 2010, October 2010, January 2011 and April 2011. Urgent and emergency calls (N=269 558; 19.0%) were analysed by call factors and patient characteristics alongside symptom classification. Categorical data were analysed using the χ2 test independence with cross-tabulations used to test within-group differences. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Urgent and emergency referrals to 999; accident emergency or to see a general practitioner which are expressed as call rate per 100 persons annum. Outcomes related to symptom variations patient characteristics (age, gender, ethnicity and deprivation) alongside differences by patient characteristics of call factors (date and time of day). Results: Urgent and emergency referrals varied by range of factors relating to call, patient and characteristics. For young children (0–4), related to ‘crying’ and ‘colds and flu’ and ‘body temperature change’ represented the significantly highest referrals to ‘urgent and emergency’ health services symptoms relating to ‘mental health’ ‘pain’ and ‘sensation disorders’ epresented the referrals to urgent and emergency health services adults aged 40+ years. Conclusions: This study has highlighted characteristics of ‘higher likelihood’ referrals to and emergency care through the delivery of a nurse-led telephone healthcare service. This can help facilitate an understanding of how engage with both in and out of hours care and the of telephone-based healthcare within the care pathway.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Cook E., Randhawa G., Guppy A., Large, S. (2015) 'A study of urgent and emergency referrals from NHS Direct within England' BMJ Open 5:e007533.doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007533
Publisher:
BMJ Publishing Group
Journal:
BMJ Open
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/558796
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007533
Additional Links:
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/5/5/e007533.full.pdf
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2044-6055
Appears in Collections:
IHR Institute for Health Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCook, Erica Janeen
dc.contributor.authorRandhawa, Gurchen
dc.contributor.authorLarge, Shirleyen
dc.contributor.authorGuppy, Andyen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-02T11:20:18Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-02T11:20:18Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationCook E., Randhawa G., Guppy A., Large, S. (2015) 'A study of urgent and emergency referrals from NHS Direct within England' BMJ Open 5:e007533.doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007533en
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055en
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007533en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/558796en
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The presented study aimed to explore referral patterns of National Health Service (NHS) Direct to determine how patients engage with telephone-based healthcare and how telephone-healthcare can manage urgent and emergency care. Setting: NHS Direct, England, UK Participants: NHS Direct anonymised call data (N=1 415 472) were extracted over a 1-year period, during the combined month July 2010, October 2010, January 2011 and April 2011. Urgent and emergency calls (N=269 558; 19.0%) were analysed by call factors and patient characteristics alongside symptom classification. Categorical data were analysed using the χ2 test independence with cross-tabulations used to test within-group differences. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Urgent and emergency referrals to 999; accident emergency or to see a general practitioner which are expressed as call rate per 100 persons annum. Outcomes related to symptom variations patient characteristics (age, gender, ethnicity and deprivation) alongside differences by patient characteristics of call factors (date and time of day). Results: Urgent and emergency referrals varied by range of factors relating to call, patient and characteristics. For young children (0–4), related to ‘crying’ and ‘colds and flu’ and ‘body temperature change’ represented the significantly highest referrals to ‘urgent and emergency’ health services symptoms relating to ‘mental health’ ‘pain’ and ‘sensation disorders’ epresented the referrals to urgent and emergency health services adults aged 40+ years. Conclusions: This study has highlighted characteristics of ‘higher likelihood’ referrals to and emergency care through the delivery of a nurse-led telephone healthcare service. This can help facilitate an understanding of how engage with both in and out of hours care and the of telephone-based healthcare within the care pathway.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/5/5/e007533.full.pdfen
dc.subjectNHS Directen
dc.subjecttelephone based healthcareen
dc.subjectemergency careen
dc.subjecturgent careen
dc.titleA study of urgent and emergency referrals from NHS Direct within Englanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalBMJ Openen
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