Exercise-associated DNA methylation change in skeletal muscle and the importance of imprinted genes: a bioinformatics meta-analysis

3.67
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/552912
Title:
Exercise-associated DNA methylation change in skeletal muscle and the importance of imprinted genes: a bioinformatics meta-analysis
Authors:
Brown, William M.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Epigenetics is the study of processes-beyond DNA sequence alteration-producing heritable characteristics. For example, DNA methylation modifies gene expression without altering the nucleotide sequence. A well-studied DNA methylation-based phenomenon is genomic imprinting (ie, genotype-independent parent-of-origin effects). OBJECTIVE: We aimed to elucidate: (1) the effect of exercise on DNA methylation and (2) the role of imprinted genes in skeletal muscle gene networks (ie, gene group functional profiling analyses). DESIGN: Gene ontology (ie, gene product elucidation)/meta-analysis. DATA SOURCES: 26 skeletal muscle and 86 imprinted genes were subjected to g:Profiler ontology analysis. Meta-analysis assessed exercise-associated DNA methylation change. DATA EXTRACTION: g:Profiler found four muscle gene networks with imprinted loci. Meta-analysis identified 16 articles (387 genes/1580 individuals) associated with exercise. Age, method, sample size, sex and tissue variation could elevate effect size bias. DATA SYNTHESIS: Only skeletal muscle gene networks including imprinted genes were reported. Exercise-associated effect sizes were calculated by gene. Age, method, sample size, sex and tissue variation were moderators. RESULTS: Six imprinted loci (RB1, MEG3, UBE3A, PLAGL1, SGCE, INS) were important for muscle gene networks, while meta-analysis uncovered five exercise-associated imprinted loci (KCNQ1, MEG3, GRB10, L3MBTL1, PLAGL1). DNA methylation decreased with exercise (60% of loci). Exercise-associated DNA methylation change was stronger among older people (ie, age accounted for 30% of the variation). Among older people, genes exhibiting DNA methylation decreases were part of a microRNA-regulated gene network functioning to suppress cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Imprinted genes were identified in skeletal muscle gene networks and exercise-associated DNA methylation change. Exercise-associated DNA methylation modification could rewind the 'epigenetic clock' as we age. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42014009800.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Exercise-associated DNA methylation change in skeletal muscle and the importance of imprinted genes: a bioinformatics meta-analysis. 2015: Br J Sports Med.
Publisher:
BMJ Publishing Group Limited
Journal:
British Journal of Sports Medicine
Issue Date:
30-Mar-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/552912
DOI:
10.1136/bjsports-2014-094073
PubMed ID:
25824446
Additional Links:
http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2015/04/10/bjsports-2014-094073.full.pdf?keytype=ref&ijkey=929M8WVu8PZAzNb
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Using bioinformatics and meta-analytic tools, Dr Brown reveals that imprinted genes are involved in skeletal muscle gene networks and exercise-associated DNA methylation change. Brown finds that exercise-associated DNA methylation is stronger in older (compared to younger) individuals and may rewind the epigenetic clock. Numerous mediators were found that could affect the degree of exercise-associated DNA methylation change such as experimental design, sample size, gender, tissue and exercise type. A list of epigenetic candidate loci are developed that could help future researchers understand how exercise may activate tumour suppressor genes and deactivate growth loci amongst older individuals. Brown refers to this as an epigenetic adaptive response to antagonistic pleiotropy (i.e., when genes with multiple targets are beneficial at younger, but not older ages after selection has weakened). For further discussion of the findings see Dr Brown's blog https://sociogenomics.wordpress.com/2015/04/12/genomic-imprinting-human-skeletal-muscle-and-exercise-epigenetics/
ISSN:
1473-0480
Sponsors:
European Office of Aerospace Research & Development
Appears in Collections:
Muscle Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrown, William M.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-15T08:19:55Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-15T08:19:55Zen
dc.date.issued2015-03-30en
dc.identifier.citationExercise-associated DNA methylation change in skeletal muscle and the importance of imprinted genes: a bioinformatics meta-analysis. 2015: Br J Sports Med.en
dc.identifier.issn1473-0480en
dc.identifier.pmid25824446en
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bjsports-2014-094073en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/552912en
dc.descriptionUsing bioinformatics and meta-analytic tools, Dr Brown reveals that imprinted genes are involved in skeletal muscle gene networks and exercise-associated DNA methylation change. Brown finds that exercise-associated DNA methylation is stronger in older (compared to younger) individuals and may rewind the epigenetic clock. Numerous mediators were found that could affect the degree of exercise-associated DNA methylation change such as experimental design, sample size, gender, tissue and exercise type. A list of epigenetic candidate loci are developed that could help future researchers understand how exercise may activate tumour suppressor genes and deactivate growth loci amongst older individuals. Brown refers to this as an epigenetic adaptive response to antagonistic pleiotropy (i.e., when genes with multiple targets are beneficial at younger, but not older ages after selection has weakened). For further discussion of the findings see Dr Brown's blog https://sociogenomics.wordpress.com/2015/04/12/genomic-imprinting-human-skeletal-muscle-and-exercise-epigenetics/en
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Epigenetics is the study of processes-beyond DNA sequence alteration-producing heritable characteristics. For example, DNA methylation modifies gene expression without altering the nucleotide sequence. A well-studied DNA methylation-based phenomenon is genomic imprinting (ie, genotype-independent parent-of-origin effects). OBJECTIVE: We aimed to elucidate: (1) the effect of exercise on DNA methylation and (2) the role of imprinted genes in skeletal muscle gene networks (ie, gene group functional profiling analyses). DESIGN: Gene ontology (ie, gene product elucidation)/meta-analysis. DATA SOURCES: 26 skeletal muscle and 86 imprinted genes were subjected to g:Profiler ontology analysis. Meta-analysis assessed exercise-associated DNA methylation change. DATA EXTRACTION: g:Profiler found four muscle gene networks with imprinted loci. Meta-analysis identified 16 articles (387 genes/1580 individuals) associated with exercise. Age, method, sample size, sex and tissue variation could elevate effect size bias. DATA SYNTHESIS: Only skeletal muscle gene networks including imprinted genes were reported. Exercise-associated effect sizes were calculated by gene. Age, method, sample size, sex and tissue variation were moderators. RESULTS: Six imprinted loci (RB1, MEG3, UBE3A, PLAGL1, SGCE, INS) were important for muscle gene networks, while meta-analysis uncovered five exercise-associated imprinted loci (KCNQ1, MEG3, GRB10, L3MBTL1, PLAGL1). DNA methylation decreased with exercise (60% of loci). Exercise-associated DNA methylation change was stronger among older people (ie, age accounted for 30% of the variation). Among older people, genes exhibiting DNA methylation decreases were part of a microRNA-regulated gene network functioning to suppress cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Imprinted genes were identified in skeletal muscle gene networks and exercise-associated DNA methylation change. Exercise-associated DNA methylation modification could rewind the 'epigenetic clock' as we age. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42014009800.en
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Office of Aerospace Research & Developmenten
dc.languageENGen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group Limiteden
dc.relation.urlhttp://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2015/04/10/bjsports-2014-094073.full.pdf?keytype=ref&ijkey=929M8WVu8PZAzNben
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to British journal of sports medicineen
dc.subjectC400 Geneticsen
dc.subjectC420 Human Geneticsen
dc.subjectC431 Medical Geneticsen
dc.subjectC440 Molecular Geneticsen
dc.subjectC182 Evolutionen
dc.subjectC600 Sports Scienceen
dc.subjectC120 Behavioural Biologyen
dc.subjectbioinformaticsen
dc.subjectDNA methylationen
dc.subjectexcerciseen
dc.titleExercise-associated DNA methylation change in skeletal muscle and the importance of imprinted genes: a bioinformatics meta-analysisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Sports Medicineen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.