Telling timber tales in higher education: a reflection on my journey with digital storytelling

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/346548
Title:
Telling timber tales in higher education: a reflection on my journey with digital storytelling
Authors:
Barnes, Veronica
Abstract:
The challenges of the Higher Education landscape are the result of massification and globalisation. The general lack of preparedness in students and lack of academic literacy means that plagiarism is increasingly a challenge in written assignments. In the South African context, this is amplified, as students may be studying in their third or fourth language. Relying on students' affinity for visual learning, digital storytelling was first used as an alternative assessment method (to a written assignment) in 2011. This paper is a reflection on a lecturer's journey with digital storytelling, beginning with the first project in the Industrial Design programme at a University of Technology in South Africa. The short movie clips, known as digital stories, were created with off-the-shelf equipment and techniques, and any open source software available to the students. By evaluating the project using the lens of Authentic Learning, some of the benefits and challenges of using this alternative means of assessment could be identified. The authentic learning, the polished end products, the engagement of students with the material, the decidedly independent learning, and the collaborative practice were recognised as key benefits. The students also saw the visual orientation of the project, the digital literacy-building, and freedom of creative expression as benefits, and revealed their resourcefulness during the student-led project. This paper also acknowledges the two models of digital storytelling, the growth of communities of practice and the possibilities for further research into this growing area of learning in Higher Education.
Affiliation:
Cape Peninsula University of Technology, South Africa
Citation:
Barnes, V. (2015) 'Telling timber tales in higher education: a reflection on my journey with digital storytelling'. Journal of pedagogic development 5 (1).
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Mar-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/346548
Additional Links:
http://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/volume-5-issue-1-march-2015/telling-timber-tales-in-higher-education-a-reflection-on-my-journey-with-digital-storytelling
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
Volume 5; Issue 1
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, Veronicaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-12T09:50:52Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-12T09:50:52Zen
dc.date.issued2015-03en
dc.identifier.citationBarnes, V. (2015) 'Telling timber tales in higher education: a reflection on my journey with digital storytelling'. Journal of pedagogic development 5 (1).en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/346548en
dc.description.abstractThe challenges of the Higher Education landscape are the result of massification and globalisation. The general lack of preparedness in students and lack of academic literacy means that plagiarism is increasingly a challenge in written assignments. In the South African context, this is amplified, as students may be studying in their third or fourth language. Relying on students' affinity for visual learning, digital storytelling was first used as an alternative assessment method (to a written assignment) in 2011. This paper is a reflection on a lecturer's journey with digital storytelling, beginning with the first project in the Industrial Design programme at a University of Technology in South Africa. The short movie clips, known as digital stories, were created with off-the-shelf equipment and techniques, and any open source software available to the students. By evaluating the project using the lens of Authentic Learning, some of the benefits and challenges of using this alternative means of assessment could be identified. The authentic learning, the polished end products, the engagement of students with the material, the decidedly independent learning, and the collaborative practice were recognised as key benefits. The students also saw the visual orientation of the project, the digital literacy-building, and freedom of creative expression as benefits, and revealed their resourcefulness during the student-led project. This paper also acknowledges the two models of digital storytelling, the growth of communities of practice and the possibilities for further research into this growing area of learning in Higher Education.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume 5en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIssue 1en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/volume-5-issue-1-march-2015/telling-timber-tales-in-higher-education-a-reflection-on-my-journey-with-digital-storytellingen
dc.subjectdigital storytellingen
dc.subjectinnovative pedagogyen
dc.subjectmultiliteraciesen
dc.subjectassessment methodsen
dc.subjectstudent engagementen
dc.subjectindustrial designen
dc.subjectauthentic learningen
dc.subjectplagiarismen
dc.subjectdigital literacyen
dc.titleTelling timber tales in higher education: a reflection on my journey with digital storytellingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCape Peninsula University of Technology, South Africaen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.