A framework for e-government success from the user’s perspective

5.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/344620
Title:
A framework for e-government success from the user’s perspective
Authors:
Almalki, Obaid
Abstract:
This thesis aims to contribute to a better understanding of e-government portal success by developing a e-government success framework from a user’s perspective. The proposed framework is underpinned by relevant theories, such as DeLone and McLean’s IS success model, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), self-efficacy theory and trust. The culture aspect has also been taken into consideration by adopting personal values theory introduced by Schwartz (1992). Three data collection methods were used. First, an exploratory study was carried to explore the main aspects and factors for understanding e-government systems success. Second, a Delphi study was conducted to investigate which of the ten value types are particularly relevant to success or have a significant impact. Third, a survey-based study was carried out to validate empirically the proposed theoretical framework. Results of the exploratory study helped to identify the potential success factors of e-government systems. The results of the Delphi study suggest that four of the ten values, namely self-direction, stimulation, security, and tradition, most likely affect e-government portal success. Structural equation modelling techniques were applied to test the research model using a large-scale survey. The findings of hypothesis testing suggested that e-government portal success (i.e. net benefit) was directly affected by actual use and user satisfaction and indirectly affect by a number of factors concerning system quality, service quality, information quality, perceived risk, and computer self-efficacy. By combining IS success model and TAM, this study found system quality, information quality and service quality affected the perceived ease of us, but service quality had no effect on perceived usefulness. However, perceived risk seemed to have no effect on attitudes towards using, but very small negative effect on perceived usefulness. Users’ computer skills was found to have no effect on perceived ease of use and very small effect on perceived usefulness. These indicate that risk and IT skills are playing less significant role in the context of e-government. The research findings confirmed that adoption was not equivalent to success, but it was the necessary precondition to success. In the personal values-attitude-behaviour model, the empirical evidence suggested that Conservation affects attitude towards use which, in turn, affects behavioural intention to re-use. Openness to change had no effect on attitude toward using. The findings provide important implications for e-government research and practice.
Citation:
Almalki, O. (2014) 'A framework for e-government success from the user’s perspective'. PhD thesis. University of Bedfordshire.
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Issue Date:
Sep-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/344620
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Description:
A thesis submitted to the University of Bedfordshire in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
Appears in Collections:
PhD e-theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAlmalki, Obaiden
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-20T13:59:26Zen
dc.date.available2015-02-20T13:59:26Zen
dc.date.issued2014-09en
dc.identifier.citationAlmalki, O. (2014) 'A framework for e-government success from the user’s perspective'. PhD thesis. University of Bedfordshire.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/344620en
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted to the University of Bedfordshire in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophyen
dc.description.abstractThis thesis aims to contribute to a better understanding of e-government portal success by developing a e-government success framework from a user’s perspective. The proposed framework is underpinned by relevant theories, such as DeLone and McLean’s IS success model, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), self-efficacy theory and trust. The culture aspect has also been taken into consideration by adopting personal values theory introduced by Schwartz (1992). Three data collection methods were used. First, an exploratory study was carried to explore the main aspects and factors for understanding e-government systems success. Second, a Delphi study was conducted to investigate which of the ten value types are particularly relevant to success or have a significant impact. Third, a survey-based study was carried out to validate empirically the proposed theoretical framework. Results of the exploratory study helped to identify the potential success factors of e-government systems. The results of the Delphi study suggest that four of the ten values, namely self-direction, stimulation, security, and tradition, most likely affect e-government portal success. Structural equation modelling techniques were applied to test the research model using a large-scale survey. The findings of hypothesis testing suggested that e-government portal success (i.e. net benefit) was directly affected by actual use and user satisfaction and indirectly affect by a number of factors concerning system quality, service quality, information quality, perceived risk, and computer self-efficacy. By combining IS success model and TAM, this study found system quality, information quality and service quality affected the perceived ease of us, but service quality had no effect on perceived usefulness. However, perceived risk seemed to have no effect on attitudes towards using, but very small negative effect on perceived usefulness. Users’ computer skills was found to have no effect on perceived ease of use and very small effect on perceived usefulness. These indicate that risk and IT skills are playing less significant role in the context of e-government. The research findings confirmed that adoption was not equivalent to success, but it was the necessary precondition to success. In the personal values-attitude-behaviour model, the empirical evidence suggested that Conservation affects attitude towards use which, in turn, affects behavioural intention to re-use. Openness to change had no effect on attitude toward using. The findings provide important implications for e-government research and practice.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.subjectG490 Computing Science not elsewhere classifieden
dc.subjecte-governmenten
dc.subjecte-government portals successen
dc.titleA framework for e-government success from the user’s perspectiveen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_GB
dc.type.qualificationlevelPhDen
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bedfordshireen
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