Information literacy and Web 2.0: developing a modern media curriculum using social bookmarking and social networking tools

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/336308
Title:
Information literacy and Web 2.0: developing a modern media curriculum using social bookmarking and social networking tools
Authors:
Daniels, Keith; Huxor, Elouise
Abstract:
The term 'Web 2.0' continues to prompt widespread discussion in terms of definition, impact upon society in general and relevance to library and information professionals in Higher Education. Web 2.0 has been described by Notess (2006:40) as '...a second wave of Web techniques to create more interactive and easy-to-use Websites using new technologies (or using older technologies in a new way)'. There has been debate in recent years concerning the importance of the adoption of Web 2.0 tools by librarians within information literacy teaching programmes. Godwin (2008:8) sees them as providing a vital link to the 'Google generation', which uses search engines effortlessly in a self-directed manner, placing complete faith in what they find on the web. He argues that Web 2.0 tools '...give us a whole set of new ways to reach our users, and tools with which to teach them.' Abram (2006) claims that librarians can guarantee the future of their profession by embracing and exploiting the potential of such technologies. Furthermore, Bradley (2006) argues that an understanding of the term Web 2.0 is unimportant, compared to an acknowledgement that librarians are in a position to do more than they could in the past and being open to it. Chad (2007) meanwhile, states that unless academic librarians embrace the Google generation they will become increasingly marginalised.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Daniels, K. & Huxor, E. (2011) 'Information literacy and web 2.0: Developing a modern media curriculum using social bookmarking and social networking tools', Journal of Pedagogic Development, 1 (2), pp.4-13.
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Nov-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/336308
Additional Links:
http://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/volume-1-issue-2/information-literacy-and-web-2
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
Volume 1; Issue 2
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDaniels, Keithen
dc.contributor.authorHuxor, Elouiseen
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-28T11:09:01Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-28T11:09:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-11-
dc.identifier.citationDaniels, K. & Huxor, E. (2011) 'Information literacy and web 2.0: Developing a modern media curriculum using social bookmarking and social networking tools', Journal of Pedagogic Development, 1 (2), pp.4-13.en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/336308-
dc.description.abstractThe term 'Web 2.0' continues to prompt widespread discussion in terms of definition, impact upon society in general and relevance to library and information professionals in Higher Education. Web 2.0 has been described by Notess (2006:40) as '...a second wave of Web techniques to create more interactive and easy-to-use Websites using new technologies (or using older technologies in a new way)'. There has been debate in recent years concerning the importance of the adoption of Web 2.0 tools by librarians within information literacy teaching programmes. Godwin (2008:8) sees them as providing a vital link to the 'Google generation', which uses search engines effortlessly in a self-directed manner, placing complete faith in what they find on the web. He argues that Web 2.0 tools '...give us a whole set of new ways to reach our users, and tools with which to teach them.' Abram (2006) claims that librarians can guarantee the future of their profession by embracing and exploiting the potential of such technologies. Furthermore, Bradley (2006) argues that an understanding of the term Web 2.0 is unimportant, compared to an acknowledgement that librarians are in a position to do more than they could in the past and being open to it. Chad (2007) meanwhile, states that unless academic librarians embrace the Google generation they will become increasingly marginalised.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume 1en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIssue 2en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/volume-1-issue-2/information-literacy-and-web-2en
dc.subjectinformation literacyen
dc.subjectWeb 2.0en
dc.subjectsocial bookmarkingen
dc.subjectsocial networkingen
dc.titleInformation literacy and Web 2.0: developing a modern media curriculum using social bookmarking and social networking toolsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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