Learning and teaching in business through rich and varied information sources

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/336265
Title:
Learning and teaching in business through rich and varied information sources
Authors:
Hughes, Ian
Abstract:
There is an old Chinese proverb, sometimes attributed to Confucius, which states 'I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand', which suggests that experience is the best teacher. There is a close fit here with issues which Kolb (1984:21)) discussed about the Lewinian experiential learning model which hinges progress in learning on the impact of the 'concrete experience'. However, another proverb sometimes attributed to Confucius says 'By three methods we may learn wisdom: First, by reflection, which is noblest; Second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third by experience, which is the bitterest.' But there is no real dichotomy here, experience can be a bitter teacher – how many students do you know (or even colleagues or perhaps even yourself) who have learned through personal bitter experience the simple lesson of 'Read the question before you start, while you are answering it, and again when you think you have finished'. For a graded summative assessment failing to consider this can be personally disastrous, but it is a lesson remembered (hopefully) by most. But is personal experience the only option? Can we learn 'experientially' from other people's experience? Dewey ( 1938:69) [A1] suggested a model of experiential learning based on observation of the environment (conditions), knowledge of what has happened in similar situations in the past – through personal experience or from information, advice or warnings from those with wider experience, and judgement to blend these into a decision (author's emphasis).
Affiliation:
University of Wolverhampton
Citation:
Hughes, I. (2012) 'Learning and teaching in business through rich and varied information sources', Journal of Pedagogic Development, 2 (1), pp.26-30.
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Mar-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/336265
Additional Links:
http://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/volume-2-issue-1/learning-and-teaching-in-business-through-rich-and-varied-information-sources
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
Volume 2; Issue 1
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Ianen
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-27T12:29:54Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-27T12:29:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012-03-
dc.identifier.citationHughes, I. (2012) 'Learning and teaching in business through rich and varied information sources', Journal of Pedagogic Development, 2 (1), pp.26-30.en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/336265-
dc.description.abstractThere is an old Chinese proverb, sometimes attributed to Confucius, which states 'I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand', which suggests that experience is the best teacher. There is a close fit here with issues which Kolb (1984:21)) discussed about the Lewinian experiential learning model which hinges progress in learning on the impact of the 'concrete experience'. However, another proverb sometimes attributed to Confucius says 'By three methods we may learn wisdom: First, by reflection, which is noblest; Second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third by experience, which is the bitterest.' But there is no real dichotomy here, experience can be a bitter teacher – how many students do you know (or even colleagues or perhaps even yourself) who have learned through personal bitter experience the simple lesson of 'Read the question before you start, while you are answering it, and again when you think you have finished'. For a graded summative assessment failing to consider this can be personally disastrous, but it is a lesson remembered (hopefully) by most. But is personal experience the only option? Can we learn 'experientially' from other people's experience? Dewey ( 1938:69) [A1] suggested a model of experiential learning based on observation of the environment (conditions), knowledge of what has happened in similar situations in the past – through personal experience or from information, advice or warnings from those with wider experience, and judgement to blend these into a decision (author's emphasis).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume 2en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIssue 1en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/volume-2-issue-1/learning-and-teaching-in-business-through-rich-and-varied-information-sourcesen
dc.subjectexperiential learningen
dc.subjectteachingen
dc.subjectrich and varied information sourcesen
dc.subjectinformationen
dc.titleLearning and teaching in business through rich and varied information sourcesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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