2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/336257
Title:
HE in FE - past, present and future
Authors:
Rapley, Eve
Abstract:
Within the post-16 education sector the terms Further Education (FE) and Higher Education (HE) are widely used and understood. Historically, their modi operandi and student population have, to a greater extent, been quite different and have operated in discreet spheres with limited overlap. Traditionally the seat of higher learning, universities dominated the HE landscape with higher education being the preserve of the few, with less than 2% of 18-year olds going to university before the Second World War (Dyhouse, 2007). This figure contrasts starkly to provisional Higher Education Initial Participation Rate (HEIPR) for 2010/11 which indicated that the rate had leapt to 47% (BIS, 2012), clearly illustrating the extent to which the HE sector has expanded since the Second World War. Traditionally universities concentrated on undergraduate and postgraduate provision whilst FE colleges (FECs) focused on vocational and adult education. However, in recent years these two ordinarily quite distinct sectors have coalesced to create a new HE hybrid; that of Higher Education in Further Education (HE in FE). Alternatively, it is referred to in some literature as the Further-Higher sector (Parry, 2009) or as the Mixed Economy sector (colleges that provide both FE and HE provision) (Honeybone, 2007).
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Rapley, E. (2012) 'HE in FE - past, present and future', Journal of Pedagogic Development, 2 (2), pp.29-33.
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Jul-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/336257
Additional Links:
http://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/volume-2-issue-2/he-in-fe-past,-present-and-future
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
Volume 2; Issue 2
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRapley, Eveen
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-27T12:09:30Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-27T12:09:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-07-
dc.identifier.citationRapley, E. (2012) 'HE in FE - past, present and future', Journal of Pedagogic Development, 2 (2), pp.29-33.en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/336257-
dc.description.abstractWithin the post-16 education sector the terms Further Education (FE) and Higher Education (HE) are widely used and understood. Historically, their modi operandi and student population have, to a greater extent, been quite different and have operated in discreet spheres with limited overlap. Traditionally the seat of higher learning, universities dominated the HE landscape with higher education being the preserve of the few, with less than 2% of 18-year olds going to university before the Second World War (Dyhouse, 2007). This figure contrasts starkly to provisional Higher Education Initial Participation Rate (HEIPR) for 2010/11 which indicated that the rate had leapt to 47% (BIS, 2012), clearly illustrating the extent to which the HE sector has expanded since the Second World War. Traditionally universities concentrated on undergraduate and postgraduate provision whilst FE colleges (FECs) focused on vocational and adult education. However, in recent years these two ordinarily quite distinct sectors have coalesced to create a new HE hybrid; that of Higher Education in Further Education (HE in FE). Alternatively, it is referred to in some literature as the Further-Higher sector (Parry, 2009) or as the Mixed Economy sector (colleges that provide both FE and HE provision) (Honeybone, 2007).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume 2en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIssue 2en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/volume-2-issue-2/he-in-fe-past,-present-and-futureen
dc.subjecthigher educationen
dc.subjectfurther educationen
dc.titleHE in FE - past, present and futureen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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