Simulation in clinical education: a reflective and critical account

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/336256
Title:
Simulation in clinical education: a reflective and critical account
Authors:
Stanley, Barbara
Abstract:
Simulation. A complex tool employed to immerse learners in a reality created specifically to elicit actions, behaviours and thought processes which can then be discussed with peers and reflected upon by the learner immediately and at leisure. This was my understanding of what simulation has to offer as an educational intervention. I viewed simulation through the lens of Honey and Mumford's (1986) experiential learning typology, seeing it satisfy all four learning styles - activist and reflector most obviously so, but theorist because of the observational element and pragmatist as the scenario unravels. It externalises what is often the internal parts of the cycle – reflection and abstract conceptualisation – through the debriefing process. I also believed that high fidelity environments offered the greatest return in terms of learning – being rather dismissive of lower fidelity tools. However, through active observation of simulation – both in a setting I am familiar with (mannequin based scenarios) and in one I am not (dental student lab-based simulation) – I am recognising that this view may be only a small aspect of what simulation has to offer and that fidelity is not everything.
Affiliation:
Brighton and Sussex University Hospital Trust
Citation:
Stanley, B. (2012) 'Simulation in clinical education: A reflective and critical account', Journal of Pedagogic Development, 2 (2), pp.26-29.
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Jul-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/336256
Additional Links:
http://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/volume-2-issue-2/simulation-in-clinical-education-a-reflective-and-critical-account
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
Volume 2; Issue 2
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStanley, Barbaraen
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-27T12:07:30Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-27T12:07:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-07-
dc.identifier.citationStanley, B. (2012) 'Simulation in clinical education: A reflective and critical account', Journal of Pedagogic Development, 2 (2), pp.26-29.en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/336256-
dc.description.abstractSimulation. A complex tool employed to immerse learners in a reality created specifically to elicit actions, behaviours and thought processes which can then be discussed with peers and reflected upon by the learner immediately and at leisure. This was my understanding of what simulation has to offer as an educational intervention. I viewed simulation through the lens of Honey and Mumford's (1986) experiential learning typology, seeing it satisfy all four learning styles - activist and reflector most obviously so, but theorist because of the observational element and pragmatist as the scenario unravels. It externalises what is often the internal parts of the cycle – reflection and abstract conceptualisation – through the debriefing process. I also believed that high fidelity environments offered the greatest return in terms of learning – being rather dismissive of lower fidelity tools. However, through active observation of simulation – both in a setting I am familiar with (mannequin based scenarios) and in one I am not (dental student lab-based simulation) – I am recognising that this view may be only a small aspect of what simulation has to offer and that fidelity is not everything.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume 2en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIssue 2en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/volume-2-issue-2/simulation-in-clinical-education-a-reflective-and-critical-accounten
dc.subjectsimulationen
dc.subjectclinical educationen
dc.titleSimulation in clinical education: a reflective and critical accounten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBrighton and Sussex University Hospital Trusten
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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