2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/336087
Title:
Transition trauma
Authors:
Brake, David R. ( 0000-0003-0580-1918 )
Abstract:
If you have been at the same university for a number of years you may find it hard to remember how it felt when you started teaching there. If you were lucky, after being told where the expenses forms are, how many library books you could sign out and the like, a colleague who had taught the courses you were going to teach in the coming year would take you aside, sit you down with the existing teaching materials, explain how the lectures that have been prepared before relate to the syllabus and how the coming year was likely to unfold. Unfortunately, this kind of easing-in process does not always occur. If there is a core of experienced staff who have taught across a variety of units in a programme and have the leisure and motivation to pass their knowledge onwards to new staff, continuity can be assured informally but this can go awry where a single member of staff is responsible for teaching a particular set of units for a number of years and then leaves or retires, or if a number of staff leave from a small team. The purpose of this piece is to outline (based in part on my own experience) some scenarios where as a result newly-arrived lecturers' experiences can be more difficult than they need to be, the student experience can be compromised by confusing inconsistencies in how they are taught, and a great deal of accumulated knowledge from lecturers who were long-serving in a department can fall between the cracks and be lost. Having identified some of these problem areas, I have some suggestions for how they can be addressed.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Brake, D. (2012) 'Transition trauma', Journal of Pedagogic Development, 2 (3), pp.54-56.
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Nov-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/336087
Additional Links:
http://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/journal-of-pedagogic-development-volume-2-issue-3/transition-trauma
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
Volume 2; Issue 3
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrake, David R.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-25T13:24:27Zen
dc.date.available2014-11-25T13:24:27Zen
dc.date.issued2012-11en
dc.identifier.citationBrake, D. (2012) 'Transition trauma', Journal of Pedagogic Development, 2 (3), pp.54-56.en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/336087en
dc.description.abstractIf you have been at the same university for a number of years you may find it hard to remember how it felt when you started teaching there. If you were lucky, after being told where the expenses forms are, how many library books you could sign out and the like, a colleague who had taught the courses you were going to teach in the coming year would take you aside, sit you down with the existing teaching materials, explain how the lectures that have been prepared before relate to the syllabus and how the coming year was likely to unfold. Unfortunately, this kind of easing-in process does not always occur. If there is a core of experienced staff who have taught across a variety of units in a programme and have the leisure and motivation to pass their knowledge onwards to new staff, continuity can be assured informally but this can go awry where a single member of staff is responsible for teaching a particular set of units for a number of years and then leaves or retires, or if a number of staff leave from a small team. The purpose of this piece is to outline (based in part on my own experience) some scenarios where as a result newly-arrived lecturers' experiences can be more difficult than they need to be, the student experience can be compromised by confusing inconsistencies in how they are taught, and a great deal of accumulated knowledge from lecturers who were long-serving in a department can fall between the cracks and be lost. Having identified some of these problem areas, I have some suggestions for how they can be addressed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume 2en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIssue 3en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/journal-of-pedagogic-development-volume-2-issue-3/transition-traumaen
dc.subjecttransitionsen
dc.subjectinstitutional memoryen
dc.subjectknowledge transferen
dc.subjecthuman resource managementen
dc.titleTransition traumaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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