Nurturing the independent-thinking practitioner: using threshold concepts to transform undergraduate learning

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/336083
Title:
Nurturing the independent-thinking practitioner: using threshold concepts to transform undergraduate learning
Authors:
Monk, Claire; Cleaver, Elizabeth; Hyland, Christina; Brotherton, Graham
Abstract:
This article explores the experience of employing the theory of threshold concepts to curricular re-design to transform students' learning experiences. As part of our annual review in 2011, programme team members raised the concern that some graduates from our vocational-type degree programme – BA (Hons) Working with Children, Young People and Families – did not appear to develop the links between 'theory' and 'practice' as effectively as other graduates. Reflection on the three-year old degree programme, designed to provide a foundation for those wishing to move into, or study further, in areas such as family support and social work, revealed two areas for further consideration. First, the programme's modular format appeared to encourage students to view aspects of their studies as unconnected. Secondly, its original design had been premised on a series of 'need to know' areas of policy, theory and practice which had been added to over time, with little taken out. In short, the curriculum appeared to have become both 'stuffed' and fragmented and did not appear to provide the ideal platform from which to engage students in the development of the knowledge, skills and understanding for future professional practice. Using the theory of threshold concepts as our starting point, we were able to identify key themes, ideas and activities that we perceived to be central to nurturing and developing independent and employable practitioners. The following article recounts our journey towards curriculum change, detailing how programme threshold concepts were identified and how these were subsequently applied in curriculum re-design.
Affiliation:
Newman University College, Birmingham
Citation:
Monk, C., Cleaver, E., Hyland, C. & Brotherton, G. (2012) 'Nuturing the independent-thinking practitioner: Using threshold concepts to transform undergraduate learning', Journal of Pedagogic Development, 2 (3), pp.10-16.
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Nov-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/336083
Additional Links:
http://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/journal-of-pedagogic-development-volume-2-issue-3/nuturing-the-independent-thinking-practitioner-using-threshold-concepts-to-transform-undergraduate-learning
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
Volume 2; Issue 3
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMonk, Claireen
dc.contributor.authorCleaver, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorHyland, Christinaen
dc.contributor.authorBrotherton, Grahamen
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-25T12:57:38Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-25T12:57:38Z-
dc.date.issued2012-11-
dc.identifier.citationMonk, C., Cleaver, E., Hyland, C. & Brotherton, G. (2012) 'Nuturing the independent-thinking practitioner: Using threshold concepts to transform undergraduate learning', Journal of Pedagogic Development, 2 (3), pp.10-16.en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/336083-
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the experience of employing the theory of threshold concepts to curricular re-design to transform students' learning experiences. As part of our annual review in 2011, programme team members raised the concern that some graduates from our vocational-type degree programme – BA (Hons) Working with Children, Young People and Families – did not appear to develop the links between 'theory' and 'practice' as effectively as other graduates. Reflection on the three-year old degree programme, designed to provide a foundation for those wishing to move into, or study further, in areas such as family support and social work, revealed two areas for further consideration. First, the programme's modular format appeared to encourage students to view aspects of their studies as unconnected. Secondly, its original design had been premised on a series of 'need to know' areas of policy, theory and practice which had been added to over time, with little taken out. In short, the curriculum appeared to have become both 'stuffed' and fragmented and did not appear to provide the ideal platform from which to engage students in the development of the knowledge, skills and understanding for future professional practice. Using the theory of threshold concepts as our starting point, we were able to identify key themes, ideas and activities that we perceived to be central to nurturing and developing independent and employable practitioners. The following article recounts our journey towards curriculum change, detailing how programme threshold concepts were identified and how these were subsequently applied in curriculum re-design.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume 2en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIssue 3en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/journal-of-pedagogic-development-volume-2-issue-3/nuturing-the-independent-thinking-practitioner-using-threshold-concepts-to-transform-undergraduate-learningen
dc.subjectthreshold conceptsen
dc.subjectvocational degreesen
dc.subjectprofessional identityen
dc.subjectcurriculum designen
dc.subjectundergraduate degreesen
dc.subjectprofessional developmenten
dc.subjectundergraduate learningen
dc.subjectindependent learningen
dc.titleNurturing the independent-thinking practitioner: using threshold concepts to transform undergraduate learningen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNewman University College, Birminghamen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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