2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/335894
Title:
WAC in FYW: building bridges and teachers as architects
Authors:
Soriano, Maria L.
Abstract:
Students entering the first-year writing classroom directly out of high school often tell me that they had to 'write differently for each teacher and class.' Imagine their confusion and apprehension when they are told that one of the objectives of FYW is to prepare them for academic writing across all disciplines! How can teachers incorporate cross-curricular skills into their lessons? More importantly, amongst the already-complex demands on the purposes and goals of FYW courses, how do students learn these techniques that teachers deem 'easily-transferrable'? I argue, first, that the FYW classroom is an ideal location to present students with the individual tools for writing in any discipline. We discuss elements of writing like organization, idea development, thesis statements, citation, and the writing process within our courses as part of the standard curriculum. Therefore, I argue that the multi-faceted roles of FYW teachers include the characteristic of architect, and assert that transforming our lessons into WAC lessons involves the incorporation of examples, standards, and formats from outside disciplines. Mentioning how thesis statements tie together English and Religion papers or how dividing a paper into sections enhances the organization of Biology lab reports and Business reports establishes connections for students. With some simple additions to teachers' lessons, students will find that the writing techniques they learn are just as crucial and useful in both core and major classes. Building these bridges reinforces the lifelong importance of writing and helps students continue to develop their writing skills across and through the college curriculum.
Affiliation:
Writing Center, John Carroll University, USA
Citation:
Soriano, M.L. (2014) 'VAC in FYW: Building bridges and teachers as architects', Journal of Pedagogic Development, 3 (2), pp.27-33.
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Jul-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/335894
Additional Links:
http://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/volume-4-issue-2/wac-in-fyw-building-bridges
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
Volume 3; Issue 2
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSoriano, Maria L.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-20T12:49:06Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-20T12:49:06Z-
dc.date.issued2014-07-
dc.identifier.citationSoriano, M.L. (2014) 'VAC in FYW: Building bridges and teachers as architects', Journal of Pedagogic Development, 3 (2), pp.27-33.en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/335894-
dc.description.abstractStudents entering the first-year writing classroom directly out of high school often tell me that they had to 'write differently for each teacher and class.' Imagine their confusion and apprehension when they are told that one of the objectives of FYW is to prepare them for academic writing across all disciplines! How can teachers incorporate cross-curricular skills into their lessons? More importantly, amongst the already-complex demands on the purposes and goals of FYW courses, how do students learn these techniques that teachers deem 'easily-transferrable'? I argue, first, that the FYW classroom is an ideal location to present students with the individual tools for writing in any discipline. We discuss elements of writing like organization, idea development, thesis statements, citation, and the writing process within our courses as part of the standard curriculum. Therefore, I argue that the multi-faceted roles of FYW teachers include the characteristic of architect, and assert that transforming our lessons into WAC lessons involves the incorporation of examples, standards, and formats from outside disciplines. Mentioning how thesis statements tie together English and Religion papers or how dividing a paper into sections enhances the organization of Biology lab reports and Business reports establishes connections for students. With some simple additions to teachers' lessons, students will find that the writing techniques they learn are just as crucial and useful in both core and major classes. Building these bridges reinforces the lifelong importance of writing and helps students continue to develop their writing skills across and through the college curriculum.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume 3en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIssue 2en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.beds.ac.uk/jpd/volume-4-issue-2/wac-in-fyw-building-bridgesen
dc.subjectacademic writingen
dc.subjectwritingen
dc.subjectwriting developmenten
dc.subjectfirst-year writingen
dc.subjectcurriculumen
dc.titleWAC in FYW: building bridges and teachers as architectsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWriting Center, John Carroll University, USAen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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