Paternalism or proportionality? experiences and outcomes of the Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/333889
Title:
Paternalism or proportionality? experiences and outcomes of the Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007
Authors:
Preston-Shoot, Michael ( 0000-0002-9347-0524 ) ; Cornish, Sally
Abstract:
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from research into the outcomes of adult protection in Scotland, with particular focus on how service users, family members and service delivery professionals perceive the effectiveness of the protection orders in the Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007. Design/methodology/approach – The study comprised analysis of Adult Protection Committee biennial reports on implementation of the 2007 Act to the Scottish Government, key informant interviews and workshops with professionals involved in adult protection leadership and practice, and case study interviews with service users, family members and practitioners. Findings – Concerns about the potential for paternalistic practice and excessive use of the protection orders within the 2007 Act have not materialised. The principle of proportionality appears to be firmly embedded in adult protection practice. Service delivery professionals, service users and family members remain acutely aware of the tensions between autonomy and protection but point to beneficial outcomes for adults at risk from the careful use of protection orders, especially banning orders. Research limitations/implications – Only ten case studies were able to be included in the study. However, the use of mixed methods enabled triangulation of the findings. Common themes emerge from across the data sources. The findings also resonate with conclusions drawn by other researchers. Practical implications – The paper identifies outcomes and challenges in respect of protecting adults at risk in Scotland. Strengths and limitations of the 2007 Act are identified. Originality/value – The paper offers a formal evaluation of the outcome of protection orders for adults at risk in Scotland. The findings are of wider policy relevance given the debates on how to legislate for adult safeguarding in England and Wales
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Preston-Shoot, M., Cornish, S. (2014) 'Paternalism or proportionality? experiences and outcomes of the Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007' The Journal of Adult Protection 16 (1):5
Publisher:
Emerald
Journal:
The Journal of Adult Protection
Issue Date:
2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/333889
DOI:
10.1108/JAP-02-2013-0006
Additional Links:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/JAP-02-2013-0006
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1466-8203
Sponsors:
The research was funded by the Scottish Government and commissioned from EKOSGEN and the University of Bedfordshire.
Appears in Collections:
Research Centre for Applied Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPreston-Shoot, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorCornish, Sallyen
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-10T13:34:18Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-10T13:34:18Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationPreston-Shoot, M., Cornish, S. (2014) 'Paternalism or proportionality? experiences and outcomes of the Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007' The Journal of Adult Protection 16 (1):5en
dc.identifier.issn1466-8203-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/JAP-02-2013-0006-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/333889-
dc.description.abstractPurpose – The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from research into the outcomes of adult protection in Scotland, with particular focus on how service users, family members and service delivery professionals perceive the effectiveness of the protection orders in the Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007. Design/methodology/approach – The study comprised analysis of Adult Protection Committee biennial reports on implementation of the 2007 Act to the Scottish Government, key informant interviews and workshops with professionals involved in adult protection leadership and practice, and case study interviews with service users, family members and practitioners. Findings – Concerns about the potential for paternalistic practice and excessive use of the protection orders within the 2007 Act have not materialised. The principle of proportionality appears to be firmly embedded in adult protection practice. Service delivery professionals, service users and family members remain acutely aware of the tensions between autonomy and protection but point to beneficial outcomes for adults at risk from the careful use of protection orders, especially banning orders. Research limitations/implications – Only ten case studies were able to be included in the study. However, the use of mixed methods enabled triangulation of the findings. Common themes emerge from across the data sources. The findings also resonate with conclusions drawn by other researchers. Practical implications – The paper identifies outcomes and challenges in respect of protecting adults at risk in Scotland. Strengths and limitations of the 2007 Act are identified. Originality/value – The paper offers a formal evaluation of the outcome of protection orders for adults at risk in Scotland. The findings are of wider policy relevance given the debates on how to legislate for adult safeguarding in England and Walesen
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research was funded by the Scottish Government and commissioned from EKOSGEN and the University of Bedfordshire.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmeralden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/JAP-02-2013-0006en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of Adult Protectionen
dc.subjectadult protectionen
dc.subjectScotlanden
dc.subjectoutcomesen
dc.subjectautonomyen
dc.subjectpaternalismen
dc.subjectprotection ordersen
dc.titlePaternalism or proportionality? experiences and outcomes of the Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Adult Protectionen
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