Towards multiple 3D bone surface identification and reconstruction using few 2D X-ray images for intraoperative applications

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/333823
Title:
Towards multiple 3D bone surface identification and reconstruction using few 2D X-ray images for intraoperative applications
Authors:
Prakoonwit, Simant
Abstract:
This article discusses a possible method to use a small number, e.g. 5, of conventional 2D X-ray images to reconstruct multiple 3D bone surfaces intraoperatively. Each bone’s edge contours in X-ray images are automatically identified. Sparse 3D landmark points of each bone are automatically reconstructed by pairing the 2D X-ray images. The reconstructed landmark point distribution on a surface is approximately optimal covering main characteristics of the surface. A statistical shape model, dense point distribution model (DPDM), is then used to fit the reconstructed optimal landmarks vertices to reconstruct a full surface of each bone separately. The reconstructed surfaces can then be visualised and manipulated by surgeons or used by surgical robotic systems.
Affiliation:
Department of Computer Science and Technology, University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Prakoonwit, S. (2012) 'Towards multiple 3D bone surface identification and reconstruction using few 2D X-ray images for intraoperative applications' International Journal of Art, Culture and Design Technology 4 (1) 13-31
Publisher:
IGI Global
Journal:
International Journal of Art, Culture and Design Technology
Issue Date:
Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/333823
DOI:
10.4018/ijacdt.2014010102
Additional Links:
http://www.igi-global.com/article/towards-multiple-3d-bone-surface-identification-and-reconstruction-using-few-2d-x-ray-images-for-intraoperative-applications/116021
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2155-4196; 2155-420X
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Computer Graphics and Visualisation (CCGV)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPrakoonwit, Simanten
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-07T11:35:54Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-07T11:35:54Z-
dc.date.issued2014-06-
dc.identifier.citationPrakoonwit, S. (2012) 'Towards multiple 3D bone surface identification and reconstruction using few 2D X-ray images for intraoperative applications' International Journal of Art, Culture and Design Technology 4 (1) 13-31en
dc.identifier.issn2155-4196-
dc.identifier.issn2155-420X-
dc.identifier.doi10.4018/ijacdt.2014010102-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/333823-
dc.description.abstractThis article discusses a possible method to use a small number, e.g. 5, of conventional 2D X-ray images to reconstruct multiple 3D bone surfaces intraoperatively. Each bone’s edge contours in X-ray images are automatically identified. Sparse 3D landmark points of each bone are automatically reconstructed by pairing the 2D X-ray images. The reconstructed landmark point distribution on a surface is approximately optimal covering main characteristics of the surface. A statistical shape model, dense point distribution model (DPDM), is then used to fit the reconstructed optimal landmarks vertices to reconstruct a full surface of each bone separately. The reconstructed surfaces can then be visualised and manipulated by surgeons or used by surgical robotic systems.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIGI Globalen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.igi-global.com/article/towards-multiple-3d-bone-surface-identification-and-reconstruction-using-few-2d-x-ray-images-for-intraoperative-applications/116021en
dc.subjectX-ray imagingen
dc.subjectX-rayen
dc.subject3D reconstructionen
dc.subjectbone surfacesen
dc.subjectdense point distribution modelen
dc.titleTowards multiple 3D bone surface identification and reconstruction using few 2D X-ray images for intraoperative applicationsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Computer Science and Technology, University of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Art, Culture and Design Technologyen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.