Implementing rigorous survey methodology within contexts of social work education, training and practice: a case study in substance use

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/332595
Title:
Implementing rigorous survey methodology within contexts of social work education, training and practice: a case study in substance use
Authors:
Hutchinson, Aisha; Allnock, Debra
Abstract:
With the integration of evidence-based practice central to all areas of social work education and training across the globe, it is crucial that we continue to engage with the methodological challenges inherent in gathering this evidence, particularly when it is related to the nature of social work education itself. As a result, this paper addresses some of the methodological challenges involved in examining the education available to social workers on engaging with substance use, both within the social work academy and local authorities in England. Drawing on experiences of implementing large scale online surveys from three substantial research projects completed by the authors, this paper highlights four methodological themes: (1) Constructing a representative sampling frame; (2) Identifying participants within organisations with many departments; (3) Response rates; and (4) Questionnaire design. While these are familiar methodological considerations, this article draws attention to the specific complexities of gathering ‘representative’ knowledge to inform educational strategies on substance use within social work education and employment contexts. Finally this paper offers lessons learned and guidance for social work academics, students and practitioners who are minded to build, or draw from, an evidence-base using representative samples from and within these environments.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Hutchinson, A., Allnock, D. (2014) 'Implementing Rigorous Survey Methodology within Contexts of Social Work Education, Training and Practice: A Case Study in Substance Use' Social Work Education, 33 (5):605-618
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Social Work Education
Issue Date:
16-Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/332595
DOI:
10.1080/02615479.2014.919071
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02615479.2014.919071
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0261-5479; 1470-1227
Appears in Collections:
Tilda Goldberg Centre for Social Work and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Aishaen
dc.contributor.authorAllnock, Debraen
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-09T13:00:05Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-09T13:00:05Z-
dc.date.issued2014-06-16-
dc.identifier.citationHutchinson, A., Allnock, D. (2014) 'Implementing Rigorous Survey Methodology within Contexts of Social Work Education, Training and Practice: A Case Study in Substance Use' Social Work Education, 33 (5):605-618en
dc.identifier.issn0261-5479-
dc.identifier.issn1470-1227-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02615479.2014.919071-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/332595-
dc.description.abstractWith the integration of evidence-based practice central to all areas of social work education and training across the globe, it is crucial that we continue to engage with the methodological challenges inherent in gathering this evidence, particularly when it is related to the nature of social work education itself. As a result, this paper addresses some of the methodological challenges involved in examining the education available to social workers on engaging with substance use, both within the social work academy and local authorities in England. Drawing on experiences of implementing large scale online surveys from three substantial research projects completed by the authors, this paper highlights four methodological themes: (1) Constructing a representative sampling frame; (2) Identifying participants within organisations with many departments; (3) Response rates; and (4) Questionnaire design. While these are familiar methodological considerations, this article draws attention to the specific complexities of gathering ‘representative’ knowledge to inform educational strategies on substance use within social work education and employment contexts. Finally this paper offers lessons learned and guidance for social work academics, students and practitioners who are minded to build, or draw from, an evidence-base using representative samples from and within these environments.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02615479.2014.919071en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Social Work Educationen
dc.subjectsocial work researchen
dc.subjectsurvey methodologyen
dc.subjectsubstance useen
dc.subjectworkforce developmenten
dc.subjectteaching research methodsen
dc.subjectresearch methodsen
dc.subjectsocial work educationen
dc.titleImplementing rigorous survey methodology within contexts of social work education, training and practice: a case study in substance useen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalSocial Work Educationen
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