The development of employment-based education on substance use for social workers in England: embedding substance use training in frameworks of Continuing Professional Development

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/332359
Title:
The development of employment-based education on substance use for social workers in England: embedding substance use training in frameworks of Continuing Professional Development
Authors:
Hutchinson, Aisha ( 0000-0002-5474-676X ) ; Allnock, Debra
Abstract:
Service users in the social care sector affected by substance use need a workforce which is skilled at protecting and supporting them, and who are able to carry out their roles and responsibilities with confidence. Workforce/Learning Development departments in children's and adults' services in England play an important role in preparing social workers to engage effectively with service users and to develop as practitioners. Drawing on data from a survey of 94 Workforce/Learning Development departments, this article examines the development of employment-based education on substance use. Only 33% of these departments had a dedicated training strategy or series of programmes on substance use, although more than half (59%) provided tools for identifying and assessing substance use. A wide range of professionals were involved in the development of this training, particularly those in specialist safeguarding and substance use roles. Social work and substance use textbooks are the main source of materials accessed to support training development. A lack of strategic engagement with substance use in social care was one of the barriers cited to adequate training provision. Implications for social work education include the importance of embedding AOD education in post-qualifying training frameworks at both university and employer levels.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Hutchinson, A., Allnock, D. (2014) 'The Development of Employment-Based Education on Substance use for Social Workers in England: Embedding Substance use Training in Frameworks of Continuing Professional Development' Social Work Education, 33 (5):589-604
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Social Work Education
Issue Date:
4-Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/332359
DOI:
10.1080/02615479.2014.919069
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02615479.2014.919069
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0261-5479; 1470-1227
Appears in Collections:
Tilda Goldberg Centre for Social Work and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Aishaen
dc.contributor.authorAllnock, Debraen
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-09T13:00:14Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-09T13:00:14Z-
dc.date.issued2014-06-04-
dc.identifier.citationHutchinson, A., Allnock, D. (2014) 'The Development of Employment-Based Education on Substance use for Social Workers in England: Embedding Substance use Training in Frameworks of Continuing Professional Development' Social Work Education, 33 (5):589-604en
dc.identifier.issn0261-5479-
dc.identifier.issn1470-1227-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02615479.2014.919069-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/332359-
dc.description.abstractService users in the social care sector affected by substance use need a workforce which is skilled at protecting and supporting them, and who are able to carry out their roles and responsibilities with confidence. Workforce/Learning Development departments in children's and adults' services in England play an important role in preparing social workers to engage effectively with service users and to develop as practitioners. Drawing on data from a survey of 94 Workforce/Learning Development departments, this article examines the development of employment-based education on substance use. Only 33% of these departments had a dedicated training strategy or series of programmes on substance use, although more than half (59%) provided tools for identifying and assessing substance use. A wide range of professionals were involved in the development of this training, particularly those in specialist safeguarding and substance use roles. Social work and substance use textbooks are the main source of materials accessed to support training development. A lack of strategic engagement with substance use in social care was one of the barriers cited to adequate training provision. Implications for social work education include the importance of embedding AOD education in post-qualifying training frameworks at both university and employer levels.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02615479.2014.919069en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Social Work Educationen
dc.subjectsubstance misuseen
dc.subjectalcoholen
dc.subjectdrugsen
dc.subjectsocial worken
dc.subjecttrainingen
dc.subjectworkforce developmenten
dc.subjectcontinuing professional developmenten
dc.subjectnational occupational standardsen
dc.titleThe development of employment-based education on substance use for social workers in England: embedding substance use training in frameworks of Continuing Professional Developmenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalSocial Work Educationen
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