2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/302252
Title:
Defoe, Robinson Crusoe, and the Barbary Pirates
Authors:
Owens, W.R.
Abstract:
This essay explores the significance for Defoe and his contemporaries of a brief episode near the beginning of Robinson Crusoe (1719) where Crusoe's ship is captured by pirates and he is held as a slave in Morocco for two years before escaping with a Morisco boy named Xury. At the time the novel was published, thousands of Christian slaves were being held in Muslim North Africa, and public campaigns to ransom them were organized on a large scale. Defoe's readers would have had access to many accounts describing how the ‘Barbary pirates’ operated, and the conditions in which their captives were held. Defoe himself regarded the activities of the pirates as a serious threat to the development of international trade and commerce, and frequently called for the creation of a pan-European military force to suppress them.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Owens, W.R. (2013) 'Defoe, Robinson Crusoe, and the Barbary Pirates', English, 62 (236), pp. 51-66
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
English
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/302252
DOI:
10.1093/english/efs061
Additional Links:
http://english.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/doi/10.1093/english/efs061
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0013-8215; 1756-1124
Appears in Collections:
English Language and Literature

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOwens, W.R.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-25T09:52:25Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-25T09:52:25Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationOwens, W.R. (2013) 'Defoe, Robinson Crusoe, and the Barbary Pirates', English, 62 (236), pp. 51-66en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0013-8215-
dc.identifier.issn1756-1124-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/english/efs061-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/302252-
dc.description.abstractThis essay explores the significance for Defoe and his contemporaries of a brief episode near the beginning of Robinson Crusoe (1719) where Crusoe's ship is captured by pirates and he is held as a slave in Morocco for two years before escaping with a Morisco boy named Xury. At the time the novel was published, thousands of Christian slaves were being held in Muslim North Africa, and public campaigns to ransom them were organized on a large scale. Defoe's readers would have had access to many accounts describing how the ‘Barbary pirates’ operated, and the conditions in which their captives were held. Defoe himself regarded the activities of the pirates as a serious threat to the development of international trade and commerce, and frequently called for the creation of a pan-European military force to suppress them.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://english.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/doi/10.1093/english/efs061en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Englishen_GB
dc.subjectDaniel Defoeen_GB
dc.subjectRobinson Crusoeen_GB
dc.titleDefoe, Robinson Crusoe, and the Barbary Piratesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEnglishen_GB
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