Coral reef populations in the Caribbean: is there a case for better protection against climate change?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/302176
Title:
Coral reef populations in the Caribbean: is there a case for better protection against climate change?
Authors:
Crabbe, M. James C.
Abstract:
Knowledge of factors that are important in coral reef growth help us to understand how reef ecosystems react following major environmental disturbances due to climate change and other anthropogenic effects. This study shows that despite a range of anthropogenic stressors, corals on the fringing reefs south of Kingston harbour, as well as corals on fringing reefs on the north coast of Jamaica near Discovery Bay can survive and grow. Skewness values for Sidastrea siderea and Porites astreoides were positive (0.85 1.64) for all sites, implying more small colonies than large colonies. Coral growth rates are part of a demographic approach to monitoring coral reef health in times of climate change, and linear extension rates (mm.yr-1) of Acropora palmata branching corals at Dairy Bull, Rio Bueno, and Pear Tree Bottom on the north coast of Jamaica were c. 50 90 mm.year-1 from 2005-2012. The range of small-scale rugosities at the Port Royal cay sites studied was lower than that at the Discovery Bay sites; for example Rio Bueno was 1.05 ± 0.15 and Dairy Bull the most rugose at 2.3 ± 0.16. Diary Bull reef has for several years been the fringing reef with the most coral cover, with a benthic community similar to that of the 1970s. We discuss whether Jamaica can learn from methods used in other Caribbean countries to better protect its coral reefs against climate change. Establishing and maintaining fully-protected marine parks in Jamaica and elsewhere in the Caribbean is one tool to help the future of the fishing industry in developing countries. Developing MPAs as part of an overall climate change policy for a country may be the best way of integrating climate change into MPA planning, management, and evaluation.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Crabbe, M.J.C. (2013) 'Coral Reef Populations in the Caribbean: Is There a Case for Better Protection against Climate Change?', American Journal of Climate Change, 02(02),pp.97-105
Publisher:
Scientific Research Publishing
Journal:
American Journal of Climate Change
Issue Date:
Jun-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/302176
DOI:
10.4236/ajcc.2013.22010
Additional Links:
http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperDownload.aspx?DOI=10.4236/ajcc.2013.22010
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Copyright © 2013 Michael James C. Crabbe. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
ISSN:
2167-9495; 2167-9509
Appears in Collections:
Environmental Monitoring Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCrabbe, M. James C.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-24T08:54:31Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-24T08:54:31Z-
dc.date.issued2013-06-
dc.identifier.citationCrabbe, M.J.C. (2013) 'Coral Reef Populations in the Caribbean: Is There a Case for Better Protection against Climate Change?', American Journal of Climate Change, 02(02),pp.97-105en_GB
dc.identifier.issn2167-9495-
dc.identifier.issn2167-9509-
dc.identifier.doi10.4236/ajcc.2013.22010-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/302176-
dc.descriptionCopyright © 2013 Michael James C. Crabbe. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_GB
dc.description.abstractKnowledge of factors that are important in coral reef growth help us to understand how reef ecosystems react following major environmental disturbances due to climate change and other anthropogenic effects. This study shows that despite a range of anthropogenic stressors, corals on the fringing reefs south of Kingston harbour, as well as corals on fringing reefs on the north coast of Jamaica near Discovery Bay can survive and grow. Skewness values for Sidastrea siderea and Porites astreoides were positive (0.85 1.64) for all sites, implying more small colonies than large colonies. Coral growth rates are part of a demographic approach to monitoring coral reef health in times of climate change, and linear extension rates (mm.yr-1) of Acropora palmata branching corals at Dairy Bull, Rio Bueno, and Pear Tree Bottom on the north coast of Jamaica were c. 50 90 mm.year-1 from 2005-2012. The range of small-scale rugosities at the Port Royal cay sites studied was lower than that at the Discovery Bay sites; for example Rio Bueno was 1.05 ± 0.15 and Dairy Bull the most rugose at 2.3 ± 0.16. Diary Bull reef has for several years been the fringing reef with the most coral cover, with a benthic community similar to that of the 1970s. We discuss whether Jamaica can learn from methods used in other Caribbean countries to better protect its coral reefs against climate change. Establishing and maintaining fully-protected marine parks in Jamaica and elsewhere in the Caribbean is one tool to help the future of the fishing industry in developing countries. Developing MPAs as part of an overall climate change policy for a country may be the best way of integrating climate change into MPA planning, management, and evaluation.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherScientific Research Publishingen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperDownload.aspx?DOI=10.4236/ajcc.2013.22010en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to American Journal of Climate Changeen_GB
dc.subjectdemographicsen_GB
dc.subjectMPAsen_GB
dc.subjecthurricanesen_GB
dc.subjectBelizeen_GB
dc.subjectJamaicaen_GB
dc.titleCoral reef populations in the Caribbean: is there a case for better protection against climate change?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen_GB
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Climate Changeen_GB
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.