The adoption of children from public care: a prospective study of outcome in adolescence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/302075
Title:
The adoption of children from public care: a prospective study of outcome in adolescence
Authors:
Dance, Cherilyn; Rushton, Alan
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To discover the outcomes for children placed late for adoption (between 5 and 11 years old) from public care and to establish which factors predict poorer outcome. METHOD: Data were collected prospectively (1993-2003) from a representative sample of domestic U.K. adoptive placements (N = 108) at the start of placement, at 1 year, and 6 years later. Most of the children entered care because of abuse and neglect. Outcome was assessed by the disruption rate, by a twofold classification of the character of continuing placements, and by an assessment of psychological well-being. RESULTS: At the adolescent follow-up, 23% of placements had disrupted, 49% were continuing positively, and 28% were continuing but with substantial ongoing difficulties. Four factors contributed independently to a higher risk of disruption: older age at placement (odds ratio = 1.07), having been singled out from siblings and rejected (5.87), time in care (1.04), and a high level of behavioral problems (1.25). Two factors predicted differences in continuing placements. CONCLUSIONS: Late adoption can be successful in that half the children made good progress, but the extent of disruptions and difficulties in continuing placements gives rise to concern. Knowledge of predictors will help in devising planning pre- and postplacement support services.
Affiliation:
King's College, London; University of Luton
Citation:
Rushton, A., & Dance, C. (2006) 'The adoption of children from public care: A prospective study of outcome in adolescence' Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 45(7), 877-883.
Publisher:
Williams & Wilkins
Journal:
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/302075
DOI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.chi.0000220850.86768.e8
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0890856709615355
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0890-8567
Appears in Collections:
Social Work, Professional Practice and the Law

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDance, Cherilynen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRushton, Alanen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-23T11:12:48Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-23T11:12:48Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationRushton, A., & Dance, C. (2006) 'The adoption of children from public care: A prospective study of outcome in adolescence' Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 45(7), 877-883.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0890-8567-
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.chi.0000220850.86768.e8-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/302075-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To discover the outcomes for children placed late for adoption (between 5 and 11 years old) from public care and to establish which factors predict poorer outcome. METHOD: Data were collected prospectively (1993-2003) from a representative sample of domestic U.K. adoptive placements (N = 108) at the start of placement, at 1 year, and 6 years later. Most of the children entered care because of abuse and neglect. Outcome was assessed by the disruption rate, by a twofold classification of the character of continuing placements, and by an assessment of psychological well-being. RESULTS: At the adolescent follow-up, 23% of placements had disrupted, 49% were continuing positively, and 28% were continuing but with substantial ongoing difficulties. Four factors contributed independently to a higher risk of disruption: older age at placement (odds ratio = 1.07), having been singled out from siblings and rejected (5.87), time in care (1.04), and a high level of behavioral problems (1.25). Two factors predicted differences in continuing placements. CONCLUSIONS: Late adoption can be successful in that half the children made good progress, but the extent of disruptions and difficulties in continuing placements gives rise to concern. Knowledge of predictors will help in devising planning pre- and postplacement support services.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWilliams & Wilkinsen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0890856709615355en_GB
dc.subjectadoptionen_GB
dc.titleThe adoption of children from public care: a prospective study of outcome in adolescenceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentKing's College, Londonen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Lutonen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.en_GB
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.