Substance use training experiences and needs: findings from a national survey of social care professionals in England

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/302074
Title:
Substance use training experiences and needs: findings from a national survey of social care professionals in England
Authors:
Dance, Cherilyn; Galvani, Sarah; Hutchinson, Aisha ( 0000-0002-5474-676X )
Abstract:
For more than 30 years there have been calls in the UK to improve training for social workers in relation to substance use. Yet very little research has explored what training practitioners have received or what their training needs are. This study sought to establish practitioners' experiences of previous training in substance use and identify their current training needs. An online survey was disseminated to 3,164 practitioners in adults' (AS) and children's (CS) social care and 12 vignette-based focus groups were also held. Of the final sample of 597, more than a third of social workers had not received any training and a further fifth only received between one and four hours. Other social care staff fared worse. Overwhelmingly, respondents said that substance use knowledge and skills were very important to their practice but their professional education had not prepared them well. They identified a number of training needs including ‘how to talk to people about substance use’ and ‘the types of intervention and treatment available’. Most social care professionals report not being adequately prepared for working with substance use, particularly basic knowledge and skills which would help them to conduct assessments and signpost people to specialist substance services.
Citation:
Galvani, S., Dance, C., & Hutchinson, A. (2012) 'Substance use training experiences and needs: findings from a national survey of social care professionals in England' Social Work Education, (ahead-of-print), 1-18.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Social Work Education: The International Journal
Issue Date:
12-Sep-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/302074
DOI:
10.1080/02615479.2012.719493
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02615479.2012.719493#.UkAhGn91gnY
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Social Work, Professional Practice and the Law

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDance, Cherilynen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGalvani, Sarahen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Aishaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-23T11:09:11Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-23T11:09:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12-
dc.identifier.citationGalvani, S., Dance, C., & Hutchinson, A. (2012) 'Substance use training experiences and needs: findings from a national survey of social care professionals in England' Social Work Education, (ahead-of-print), 1-18.en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02615479.2012.719493-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/302074-
dc.description.abstractFor more than 30 years there have been calls in the UK to improve training for social workers in relation to substance use. Yet very little research has explored what training practitioners have received or what their training needs are. This study sought to establish practitioners' experiences of previous training in substance use and identify their current training needs. An online survey was disseminated to 3,164 practitioners in adults' (AS) and children's (CS) social care and 12 vignette-based focus groups were also held. Of the final sample of 597, more than a third of social workers had not received any training and a further fifth only received between one and four hours. Other social care staff fared worse. Overwhelmingly, respondents said that substance use knowledge and skills were very important to their practice but their professional education had not prepared them well. They identified a number of training needs including ‘how to talk to people about substance use’ and ‘the types of intervention and treatment available’. Most social care professionals report not being adequately prepared for working with substance use, particularly basic knowledge and skills which would help them to conduct assessments and signpost people to specialist substance services.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02615479.2012.719493#.UkAhGn91gnYen_GB
dc.subjectalcoholen_GB
dc.subjectdrugsen_GB
dc.subjecteducationen_GB
dc.subjectsocial worken_GB
dc.subjecttrainingen_GB
dc.subjectL500 Social Worken_GB
dc.titleSubstance use training experiences and needs: findings from a national survey of social care professionals in Englanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalSocial Work Education: The International Journalen_GB
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