Identifying and assessing substance use: findings from a national survey of social work and social care professionals

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/302070
Title:
Identifying and assessing substance use: findings from a national survey of social work and social care professionals
Authors:
Dance, Cherilyn; Hutchinson, Aisha ( 0000-0002-5474-676X ) ; Galvani, Sarah
Abstract:
Social care practitioners regularly encounter problematic substance use among their service users. However, most social care practitioners do not specialise in substance use and there is limited evidence on their practice with it. This study aimed to explore the practice of social care professionals when they encounter substance use in the course of their work. This article focuses specifically on how they identify and assess substance use. A web-based survey was disseminated to 3,164 practitioners in adults' (AS) and children's (CS) social care in eleven different local authorities in England. Twelve focus groups were also held. AS and CS practitioners identified substance problems by their impact on their service user's ability to fulfil their responsibilities or perform daily functions. Differences in relation to assessment were found between AS and CS practitioners. CS practitioners asked questions more frequently and were more likely to state that asking about substance use was a legitimate task. Very few practitioners had practice guidance or tools to help them assess substance use. Substance use is being identified and assessed in social care but often at a late stage with little to no guidance on how to do so effectively.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Galvani, S., Hutchinson, A., & Dance, C. (2013). 'Identifying and Assessing Substance Use: Findings from a National Survey of Social Work and Social Care Professionals' British Journal of Social Work first published online March 13, 2013 doi:10.1093/bjsw/bct033
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
British Journal of Social Work.
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/302070
DOI:
10.1093/bjsw/bct033
Additional Links:
http://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2013/03/13/bjsw.bct033.abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Tilda Goldberg Centre for Social Work and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDance, Cherilynen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Aishaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGalvani, Sarahen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-23T10:51:31Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-23T10:51:31Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationGalvani, S., Hutchinson, A., & Dance, C. (2013). 'Identifying and Assessing Substance Use: Findings from a National Survey of Social Work and Social Care Professionals' British Journal of Social Work first published online March 13, 2013 doi:10.1093/bjsw/bct033en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bjsw/bct033-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/302070-
dc.description.abstractSocial care practitioners regularly encounter problematic substance use among their service users. However, most social care practitioners do not specialise in substance use and there is limited evidence on their practice with it. This study aimed to explore the practice of social care professionals when they encounter substance use in the course of their work. This article focuses specifically on how they identify and assess substance use. A web-based survey was disseminated to 3,164 practitioners in adults' (AS) and children's (CS) social care in eleven different local authorities in England. Twelve focus groups were also held. AS and CS practitioners identified substance problems by their impact on their service user's ability to fulfil their responsibilities or perform daily functions. Differences in relation to assessment were found between AS and CS practitioners. CS practitioners asked questions more frequently and were more likely to state that asking about substance use was a legitimate task. Very few practitioners had practice guidance or tools to help them assess substance use. Substance use is being identified and assessed in social care but often at a late stage with little to no guidance on how to do so effectively.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2013/03/13/bjsw.bct033.abstracten_GB
dc.subjectalcoholen_GB
dc.subjectdrugsen_GB
dc.subjectsocial worken_GB
dc.subjectassessmenten_GB
dc.subjectidentifyingen_GB
dc.titleIdentifying and assessing substance use: findings from a national survey of social work and social care professionalsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen_GB
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Social Work.en_GB
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