2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/302008
Title:
Social work competences : core knowledge, values and skills
Authors:
Cosis-Brown, Helen
Abstract:
The knowledge base of social work The relationship between social work practice and knowledge has always been ambivalent, sometimes even dismissive. The social work profession emphasises the need to link theory and practice, making this ability a requirement for qualification. It has been argued that the ‘insistence that theory and practice are complementary aspects of the same thing is part of a verbal rather than a real tradition in social work’ (Sheldon, 1978:1). Other research shows that few social workers inform their work with theory, being more likely to rely on their own experience or advice from colleagues (Carew, 1979). Sheldon's work uncovered two distinct subcultures within social work, a theoretical one and a practice one. Findings of work undertaken by the theoretical subculture are either not believed, by the practice subculture, or ‘are seen as the products of a process which has little direct relevance to the practice situation’ .
Citation:
Cosis-Brown, H. (1996) ‘The knowledge base of social work’, in A. A.Vass, (ed), Social Work Competences: Core Knowledge, Values and Skills, London: Sage, pp.8-35.
Publisher:
SAGE Publications Ltd
Issue Date:
1996
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/302008
DOI:
10.4135/9781446250495
Type:
Book
Language:
en
ISBN:
9780803978003
Appears in Collections:
Social Work, Professional Practice and the Law

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCosis-Brown, Helenen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-20T12:37:52Zen
dc.date.available2013-09-20T12:37:52Zen
dc.date.issued1996en
dc.identifier.citationCosis-Brown, H. (1996) ‘The knowledge base of social work’, in A. A.Vass, (ed), Social Work Competences: Core Knowledge, Values and Skills, London: Sage, pp.8-35.en_GB
dc.identifier.isbn9780803978003en
dc.identifier.doi10.4135/9781446250495en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/302008en
dc.description.abstractThe knowledge base of social work The relationship between social work practice and knowledge has always been ambivalent, sometimes even dismissive. The social work profession emphasises the need to link theory and practice, making this ability a requirement for qualification. It has been argued that the ‘insistence that theory and practice are complementary aspects of the same thing is part of a verbal rather than a real tradition in social work’ (Sheldon, 1978:1). Other research shows that few social workers inform their work with theory, being more likely to rely on their own experience or advice from colleagues (Carew, 1979). Sheldon's work uncovered two distinct subcultures within social work, a theoretical one and a practice one. Findings of work undertaken by the theoretical subculture are either not believed, by the practice subculture, or ‘are seen as the products of a process which has little direct relevance to the practice situation’ .en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGE Publications Ltden_GB
dc.titleSocial work competences : core knowledge, values and skillsen
dc.typeBooken
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