2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/301909
Title:
A framework for assessing threats and benefits to species responding to climate change
Authors:
Thomas, Chris D.; Hill, Jane K.; Anderson, Barbara J.; Bailey, Sallie; Beale, Colin M.; Bradbury, Richard B.; Bulman, Caroline R.; Crick, Humphrey Q. P.; Eigenbrod, Felix; Griffiths, Hannah M.; Kunin, William E.; Oliver, Tom H.; Walmsley, Clive A.; Watts, Kevin; Worsfold, Nicholas T.; Yardley, Tim
Abstract:
Current national and international frameworks for assessing threats to species have not been developed in the context of climate change, and are not framed in a way that recognises new opportunities that arise from climate change. The framework presented here separates the threats and benefits of climate change for individual species. Threat is assessed by the level of climate-related decline within a species’ recently occupied (e.g. pre-1970s) historical distribution, based on observed (e.g. repeat census) and/or projected changes (e.g. modelled bioclimate space). Benefits are assessed in terms of observed and/or projected increases outside the recently occupied historical range. Exacerbating factors (e.g. small population size, low dispersal capacity) that might increase levels of threat or limit expansion in response to climate change are taken into consideration within the framework. Protocols are also used to identify levels of confidence (and hence research and/or monitoring needs) in each species’ assessment.
Affiliation:
University of York; Forestry Commission; Royal Society for the Protection of Birds; Butterfly Conservation; Natural England; University of Sheffield; NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology; Countryside Council for Wales; Forest Research
Citation:
Thomas, C.D. Hill, J.K., Anderson, B.A. et al. (2011) 'A framework for assessing threats and benefits to species responding to climate change', Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 2(2),pp.125-142
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell
Journal:
Methods in Ecology and Evolution
Issue Date:
Apr-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/301909
DOI:
10.1111/j.2041-210X.2010.00065.x
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.2041-210X.2010.00065.x
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2041-210X
Appears in Collections:
Environmental Monitoring Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Chris D.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHill, Jane K.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Barbara J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Sallieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeale, Colin M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBradbury, Richard B.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBulman, Caroline R.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCrick, Humphrey Q. P.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorEigenbrod, Felixen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Hannah M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorKunin, William E.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorOliver, Tom H.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWalmsley, Clive A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWatts, Kevinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWorsfold, Nicholas T.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorYardley, Timen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-19T12:48:14Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-19T12:48:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-04-
dc.identifier.citationThomas, C.D. Hill, J.K., Anderson, B.A. et al. (2011) 'A framework for assessing threats and benefits to species responding to climate change', Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 2(2),pp.125-142en_GB
dc.identifier.issn2041-210X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.2041-210X.2010.00065.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/301909-
dc.description.abstractCurrent national and international frameworks for assessing threats to species have not been developed in the context of climate change, and are not framed in a way that recognises new opportunities that arise from climate change. The framework presented here separates the threats and benefits of climate change for individual species. Threat is assessed by the level of climate-related decline within a species’ recently occupied (e.g. pre-1970s) historical distribution, based on observed (e.g. repeat census) and/or projected changes (e.g. modelled bioclimate space). Benefits are assessed in terms of observed and/or projected increases outside the recently occupied historical range. Exacerbating factors (e.g. small population size, low dispersal capacity) that might increase levels of threat or limit expansion in response to climate change are taken into consideration within the framework. Protocols are also used to identify levels of confidence (and hence research and/or monitoring needs) in each species’ assessment.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley Blackwellen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.2041-210X.2010.00065.xen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Methods in Ecology and Evolutionen_GB
dc.subjectbiodiversityen_GB
dc.subjectclimate envelopeen_GB
dc.subjectdistributionen_GB
dc.subjectglobal warmingen_GB
dc.subjectIUCNen_GB
dc.subjectpolicyen_GB
dc.subjectrisk assessmenten_GB
dc.subjectspecies conservationen_GB
dc.subjectconservationen_GB
dc.titleA framework for assessing threats and benefits to species responding to climate changeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Yorken_GB
dc.contributor.departmentForestry Commissionen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentRoyal Society for the Protection of Birdsen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentButterfly Conservationen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNatural Englanden_GB
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Sheffielden_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrologyen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentCountryside Council for Walesen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentForest Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.journalMethods in Ecology and Evolutionen_GB
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