Hyperarticulation of vowels enhances phonetic change responses in both native and non-native speakers of English: evidence from an auditory event-related potential study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/300066
Title:
Hyperarticulation of vowels enhances phonetic change responses in both native and non-native speakers of English: evidence from an auditory event-related potential study
Authors:
Uther, Maria ( 0000-0002-7948-302X ) ; Giannakopoulou, Anastasia; Iverson, Paul ( 0000-0002-7766-2390 )
Abstract:
The finding that hyperarticulation of vowel sounds occurs in certain speech registers (e.g., infant- and foreigner-directed speech) suggests that hyperarticulation may have a didactic function in facilitating acquisition of new phonetic categories in language learners. This event-related potential study tested whether hyperarticulation of vowels elicits larger phonetic change responses, as indexed by the mismatch negativity (MMN) component of the auditory event-related potential (ERP) and tested native and non-native speakers of English. Data from 11 native English-speaking and 10 native Greek-speaking participants showed that Greek speakers in general had smaller MMNs compared to English speakers, confirming previous studies demonstrating sensitivity of the MMN to language background. In terms of the effect of hyperarticulation, hyperarticulated stimuli elicited larger MMNs for both language groups, suggesting vowel space expansion does elicit larger pre-attentive phonetic change responses. Interestingly Greek native speakers showed some P3a activity that was not present in the English native speakers, raising the possibility that additional attentional switch mechanisms are activated in non-native speakers compared to native speakers. These results give general support for models of speech learning such as Kuhl's Native Language Magnet enhanced (NLM-e) theory.
Citation:
Uther, M., Giannakopoulou, A. & Iverson, P. (2012) 'Hyperarticulation of vowels enhances phonetic change responses in both native and non-native speakers of English: Evidence from an auditory event-related potential study', Brain Research, 1470, pp.52-58
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Brain Research
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/300066
DOI:
10.1016/j.brainres.2012.06.041
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S000689931201116X
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
00068993
Appears in Collections:
Research Centre for Applied Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorUther, Mariaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGiannakopoulou, Anastasiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIverson, Paulen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-28T14:04:47Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-28T14:04:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationUther, M., Giannakopoulou, A. & Iverson, P. (2012) 'Hyperarticulation of vowels enhances phonetic change responses in both native and non-native speakers of English: Evidence from an auditory event-related potential study', Brain Research, 1470, pp.52-58en_GB
dc.identifier.issn00068993-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.brainres.2012.06.041-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/300066-
dc.description.abstractThe finding that hyperarticulation of vowel sounds occurs in certain speech registers (e.g., infant- and foreigner-directed speech) suggests that hyperarticulation may have a didactic function in facilitating acquisition of new phonetic categories in language learners. This event-related potential study tested whether hyperarticulation of vowels elicits larger phonetic change responses, as indexed by the mismatch negativity (MMN) component of the auditory event-related potential (ERP) and tested native and non-native speakers of English. Data from 11 native English-speaking and 10 native Greek-speaking participants showed that Greek speakers in general had smaller MMNs compared to English speakers, confirming previous studies demonstrating sensitivity of the MMN to language background. In terms of the effect of hyperarticulation, hyperarticulated stimuli elicited larger MMNs for both language groups, suggesting vowel space expansion does elicit larger pre-attentive phonetic change responses. Interestingly Greek native speakers showed some P3a activity that was not present in the English native speakers, raising the possibility that additional attentional switch mechanisms are activated in non-native speakers compared to native speakers. These results give general support for models of speech learning such as Kuhl's Native Language Magnet enhanced (NLM-e) theory.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S000689931201116Xen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Brain Researchen_GB
dc.titleHyperarticulation of vowels enhances phonetic change responses in both native and non-native speakers of English: evidence from an auditory event-related potential studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBrain Researchen_GB
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