2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/300042
Title:
Manageable discord: fraud and resistance in the social security system
Authors:
Dean, Hartley; Melrose, Margaret
Abstract:
This article presents findings from a study of the attitudes and beliefs of social security claimants engaged in benefit fraud. The basis for a taxonomy of such claimants is outlined, drawing upon concepts of reflexivity and anxiety. This is compared and contrasted with other theoretically-drawn taxonomies, one relating to workplace crime, the other to the consumption of social care services. Finally, the article considers whether benefit fraud is intelligible as resistance to social control. It is argued that benefit fraud represents a conservative form of resistance. Benefit fraud does not signify a “culture” of resistance, so much as a “manageable” form of rule-breaking.
Citation:
Dean, H., Melrose, M.. (1997). Manageable discord: fraud and resistance in the social security system. Social Policy and Administration, 31 (2), p103-118.
Journal:
Social Policy and Administration. An international Journal of Policy and Research
Issue Date:
Jun-1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/300042
DOI:
10.1111/1467-9515.00043
Additional Links:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/links/doi/10.1111%2F1467-9515.00043
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0144-5596; 1467-9515
Appears in Collections:
The Centre for Young People, Poverty and Social Disadvantage

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDean, Hartleyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMelrose, Margareten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-28T13:41:04Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-28T13:41:04Z-
dc.date.issued1997-06-
dc.identifier.citationDean, H., Melrose, M.. (1997). Manageable discord: fraud and resistance in the social security system. Social Policy and Administration, 31 (2), p103-118.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0144-5596-
dc.identifier.issn1467-9515-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1467-9515.00043-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/300042-
dc.description.abstractThis article presents findings from a study of the attitudes and beliefs of social security claimants engaged in benefit fraud. The basis for a taxonomy of such claimants is outlined, drawing upon concepts of reflexivity and anxiety. This is compared and contrasted with other theoretically-drawn taxonomies, one relating to workplace crime, the other to the consumption of social care services. Finally, the article considers whether benefit fraud is intelligible as resistance to social control. It is argued that benefit fraud represents a conservative form of resistance. Benefit fraud does not signify a “culture” of resistance, so much as a “manageable” form of rule-breaking.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/links/doi/10.1111%2F1467-9515.00043en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Social Policy and Administrationen_GB
dc.subjectsocial securityen_GB
dc.subjectfrauden_GB
dc.subjectreflexivityen_GB
dc.subjectanxietyen_GB
dc.subjectresistanceen_GB
dc.titleManageable discord: fraud and resistance in the social security systemen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalSocial Policy and Administration. An international Journal of Policy and Researchen_GB
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.