To what extent could local general practitioners commissioning help increase the effectiveness of NHS at primary care? A meta-ethnographic study in the UK.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/296892
Title:
To what extent could local general practitioners commissioning help increase the effectiveness of NHS at primary care? A meta-ethnographic study in the UK.
Authors:
Regmi, Krishna; Bone, Anthony; McGowan, Fiona
Abstract:
The UK coalition government's recent White Paper 2010 places GPs at the centre of the commissioning process through the establishment of GP consortia by April 2010 (DH, 2010a, 2010b) where GP consortia will be responsible for commissioning primary care services. In the past, the commissioning authorities and responsibilities were given to the PCTs (DH, 2010c). It has been noted that under these reforms public health responsibilities will be divided between local authorities and the new national public health service (DH, 2010a,b,c). It is claimed that local GP commissioning will bring high-quality and cost-effective care to local communities by 'patient empowerment, local professional judgement and greater provider dynamisms' (Steven, 2010, p.231). Making "... services more directly accountable to patients and communities" is the key aim of the NHS reform (Great Britain. Parliament. House of Common, 2011, p.x). But is that often the case? This paper will attempt to further discuss this question.
Citation:
Regmi, K., Bone, A. & McGowan, F. (2011) 'To what extent could local general practitioners commissioning help increase the effectiveness of NHS at primary care? A meta-ethnographic study in the UK', American Journal of Health Studies, 26 (3), pp.160-173.
Publisher:
University of Alabama
Journal:
American Journal of Health Studies
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/296892
Additional Links:
http://www.thefreelibrary.com/To+what+extent+could+local+general+practitioners+commissioning+help...-a0308741519
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1090-0500
Appears in Collections:
IHR Institute for Health Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRegmi, Krishnaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBone, Anthonyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGowan, Fionaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-23T14:52:55Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-23T14:52:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationRegmi, K., Bone, A. & McGowan, F. (2011) 'To what extent could local general practitioners commissioning help increase the effectiveness of NHS at primary care? A meta-ethnographic study in the UK', American Journal of Health Studies, 26 (3), pp.160-173.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1090-0500-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/296892-
dc.description.abstractThe UK coalition government's recent White Paper 2010 places GPs at the centre of the commissioning process through the establishment of GP consortia by April 2010 (DH, 2010a, 2010b) where GP consortia will be responsible for commissioning primary care services. In the past, the commissioning authorities and responsibilities were given to the PCTs (DH, 2010c). It has been noted that under these reforms public health responsibilities will be divided between local authorities and the new national public health service (DH, 2010a,b,c). It is claimed that local GP commissioning will bring high-quality and cost-effective care to local communities by 'patient empowerment, local professional judgement and greater provider dynamisms' (Steven, 2010, p.231). Making "... services more directly accountable to patients and communities" is the key aim of the NHS reform (Great Britain. Parliament. House of Common, 2011, p.x). But is that often the case? This paper will attempt to further discuss this question.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Alabamaen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.thefreelibrary.com/To+what+extent+could+local+general+practitioners+commissioning+help...-a0308741519en_GB
dc.titleTo what extent could local general practitioners commissioning help increase the effectiveness of NHS at primary care? A meta-ethnographic study in the UK.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Health Studiesen_GB
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