2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/295988
Title:
Injury, imagery, and self-esteem in dance healthy minds in injured bodies?
Authors:
Nordin-Bates, Sanna M.; Walker, Imogen J.; Baker, Jo; Garner, Jocelyn; Hardy, Cinzia; Irvine, Sarah; Jola, Corinne; Laws, Helen; Blevins, Peta
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to investigate a selection of psychological variables (help-seeking behaviors, mental imagery, self-esteem) in relation to injury among UK dancers. We recruited 216 participants from eight dance styles and six levels of involvement. It was found that 83.5% of the participants had experienced at least one injury in the past year. The most common response to injury was to inform someone, and most continued to dance when injured, albeit carefully. Physical therapy was the most common treatment sought when an injury occurred (38.1%), and dancers seemed to follow recommendations offered. Injured and non-injured dancers did not differ in their imagery frequencies (facilitative, debilitative, or injury-related) and scored similarly (and relatively high) in self-esteem. Neither facilitative nor debilitative imagery was correlated with self-esteem, but dancers who engaged in more facilitative imagery in general also reported doing so when injured. Altogether, it appears that injury is not related to dancers' self-esteem or imagery, at least not when injuries are mild or moderate. Even so, such conclusions should be made with caution, given that most dancers do sustain at least one injury each year.
Citation:
Nordin-Bates, S. M., Walker, I.J., Baker, J. et al.(2011) 'Injury, Imagery, and Self-Esteem in Dance: Healthy Minds in Injured Bodies?', Journal of Dance Medicine and Science, 15(2), pp.76-85.
Publisher:
J Michael Ryan
Journal:
Journal of dance medicine & science
Issue Date:
Jun-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/295988
PubMed ID:
21703096
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21703096; http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/jmrp/jdms/2011/00000015/00000002/art00004?token=00511ed16cfdb36a4be1f567232d45232b5f245a38592c4b636676663568293c62207d673f582f6bf
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1089-313X
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Applied Research in Dance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNordin-Bates, Sanna M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Imogen J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Joen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGarner, Jocelynen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHardy, Cinziaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIrvine, Sarahen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJola, Corinneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaws, Helenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBlevins, Petaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-15T08:53:30Zen
dc.date.available2013-07-15T08:53:30Zen
dc.date.issued2011-06en
dc.identifier.citationNordin-Bates, S. M., Walker, I.J., Baker, J. et al.(2011) 'Injury, Imagery, and Self-Esteem in Dance: Healthy Minds in Injured Bodies?', Journal of Dance Medicine and Science, 15(2), pp.76-85.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1089-313Xen
dc.identifier.pmid21703096en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/295988en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate a selection of psychological variables (help-seeking behaviors, mental imagery, self-esteem) in relation to injury among UK dancers. We recruited 216 participants from eight dance styles and six levels of involvement. It was found that 83.5% of the participants had experienced at least one injury in the past year. The most common response to injury was to inform someone, and most continued to dance when injured, albeit carefully. Physical therapy was the most common treatment sought when an injury occurred (38.1%), and dancers seemed to follow recommendations offered. Injured and non-injured dancers did not differ in their imagery frequencies (facilitative, debilitative, or injury-related) and scored similarly (and relatively high) in self-esteem. Neither facilitative nor debilitative imagery was correlated with self-esteem, but dancers who engaged in more facilitative imagery in general also reported doing so when injured. Altogether, it appears that injury is not related to dancers' self-esteem or imagery, at least not when injuries are mild or moderate. Even so, such conclusions should be made with caution, given that most dancers do sustain at least one injury each year.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJ Michael Ryanen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21703096en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/jmrp/jdms/2011/00000015/00000002/art00004?token=00511ed16cfdb36a4be1f567232d45232b5f245a38592c4b636676663568293c62207d673f582f6bfen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshDancingen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshImaginationen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPatient Acceptance of Health Careen
dc.subject.meshPhysical Therapy Modalitiesen
dc.subject.meshSelf Concepten
dc.subject.meshSelf Efficacyen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.titleInjury, imagery, and self-esteem in dance healthy minds in injured bodies?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of dance medicine & scienceen_GB

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