What examining teaching metaphors tells us about pre-service teachers' developing beliefs about teaching and learning

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/295214
Title:
What examining teaching metaphors tells us about pre-service teachers' developing beliefs about teaching and learning
Authors:
Tannehill, Deborah; MacPhail, Ann
Abstract:
Pre-service teachers (PSTs) typically do not change their beliefs about teaching and learning during teacher education unless they are confronted with, and challenged about, their held beliefs through powerful and meaningful experiences that cause them to recognise and value the change process and its consequences for themselves and their learners. It has been suggested that examining teaching narratives and metaphors might be one way for teacher education to help PSTs in recognising their pre-existing beliefs about teaching and learning. Such practices assist PSTs to reflect on and examine these beliefs and how they impact both their teaching and the learning of their students. The purpose of this study was to understand how the process of examining metaphors influences PSTs' development of beliefs about teaching and learning.
Citation:
Tannehill, D. & MacPhail, A. (2012) 'What examining teaching metaphors tells us about pre-service teachers' developing beliefs about teaching and learning', Physical Education & Sport Pedagogy 9 Oct 2012 [Online]. Available at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17408989.2012.732056#.UdWLMKzciWQ (Accessed: 4 July 2013).
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Physical Education & Sport Pedagogy
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/295214
DOI:
10.1080/17408989.2012.732056
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17408989.2012.732056
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1740-8989; 1742-5786
Appears in Collections:
Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTannehill, Deborahen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMacPhail, Annen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-04T15:02:02Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-04T15:02:02Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationTannehill, D. & MacPhail, A. (2012) 'What examining teaching metaphors tells us about pre-service teachers' developing beliefs about teaching and learning', Physical Education & Sport Pedagogy 9 Oct 2012 [Online]. Available at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17408989.2012.732056#.UdWLMKzciWQ (Accessed: 4 July 2013).en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1740-8989-
dc.identifier.issn1742-5786-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17408989.2012.732056-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/295214-
dc.description.abstractPre-service teachers (PSTs) typically do not change their beliefs about teaching and learning during teacher education unless they are confronted with, and challenged about, their held beliefs through powerful and meaningful experiences that cause them to recognise and value the change process and its consequences for themselves and their learners. It has been suggested that examining teaching narratives and metaphors might be one way for teacher education to help PSTs in recognising their pre-existing beliefs about teaching and learning. Such practices assist PSTs to reflect on and examine these beliefs and how they impact both their teaching and the learning of their students. The purpose of this study was to understand how the process of examining metaphors influences PSTs' development of beliefs about teaching and learning.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17408989.2012.732056en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Physical Education & Sport Pedagogyen_GB
dc.subjectmetaphorsen_GB
dc.subjectPETEen_GB
dc.subjectteaching and learningen_GB
dc.subjectX300 Academic studies in Educationen_GB
dc.titleWhat examining teaching metaphors tells us about pre-service teachers' developing beliefs about teaching and learningen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPhysical Education & Sport Pedagogyen_GB
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