2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/295141
Title:
The electronic state: Estonia’s new media revolution
Authors:
Charles, Alec
Abstract:
This article examines the case of Estonia as one of Europe’s fastest growing informational economies, and asks whether its furious development of new media technologies, as industrial products, commercial resources and political instruments, has necessarily proven as beneficial to society at large as some domestic and international commentators have anticipated. After mapping Estonia’s unique development in embracing new technologies since the mid-1990s, the article concludes with a study of Estonia’s recent experiments in electronic voting: in 2007, Estonia was lauded as the first country in the world to afford voters at national parliamentary elections the opportunity to vote online from their homes. The article is based on a series of interviews conducted by the author with a number of prominent figures in Estonia’s IT industry, private and voluntary sectors, government service and politics. It addresses issues arising out of academic literature relating to the ethical, social and political aspects of the proliferation of new media, within the context of related surveys and reports produced by governmental and transnational organisations.
Citation:
Charles, A. (2009) 'The electronic state: Estonia’s new media revolution', Journal of Contemporary European Research, 5(1), pp. 97-113.
Publisher:
University Association for Contemporary European Studies (UACES)
Journal:
Journal of Contemporary European Research
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/295141
Additional Links:
http://www.jcer.net/index.php/jcer/article/view/122
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1815-347X
Appears in Collections:
Journalism

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCharles, Alecen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-03T09:41:31Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-03T09:41:31Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationCharles, A. (2009) 'The electronic state: Estonia’s new media revolution', Journal of Contemporary European Research, 5(1), pp. 97-113.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1815-347X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/295141-
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the case of Estonia as one of Europe’s fastest growing informational economies, and asks whether its furious development of new media technologies, as industrial products, commercial resources and political instruments, has necessarily proven as beneficial to society at large as some domestic and international commentators have anticipated. After mapping Estonia’s unique development in embracing new technologies since the mid-1990s, the article concludes with a study of Estonia’s recent experiments in electronic voting: in 2007, Estonia was lauded as the first country in the world to afford voters at national parliamentary elections the opportunity to vote online from their homes. The article is based on a series of interviews conducted by the author with a number of prominent figures in Estonia’s IT industry, private and voluntary sectors, government service and politics. It addresses issues arising out of academic literature relating to the ethical, social and political aspects of the proliferation of new media, within the context of related surveys and reports produced by governmental and transnational organisations.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity Association for Contemporary European Studies (UACES)en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jcer.net/index.php/jcer/article/view/122en_GB
dc.subjectnew mediaen_GB
dc.subjectcommunicationen_GB
dc.titleThe electronic state: Estonia’s new media revolutionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Contemporary European Researchen_GB
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