2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/295134
Title:
Reflections on communication and sport: on mediatization and cultural analysis
Authors:
Whannel, Garry
Abstract:
In this essay, Garry Whannel reflects on why research on media and sport has often been disdained by traditional academia and liberal intelligentsia. The first section argues that mediated sports are an important constituent part of popular culture, making its discourses worthy of scholarly study. The second section considers how early studies of mediated sport set in the tradition of British cultural studies opened the door to a inquiry that has grown in importance in both critical sport and media studies. The central section focuses on the complexities of “sport analysis, snobbery, and anti-intellectualism.” Considered here is the early and continued resistance to the study of media and sport and its derogatory stigmatization as a “Mickey Mouse” subject even in the face of excellent scholarship that has developed around the cultural and political analysis of sport. The article closes with suggestions for future work and ways to change narrative constructions of the field.
Citation:
Whannel, G. (2013) 'Reflections on communication and sport: on mediatization and cultural analysis', Communication and Sport, 1 (1-2), pp.7-17.
Publisher:
Sage Journals
Journal:
Communication and Sport
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/295134
DOI:
10.1177/2167479512471335
Additional Links:
http://com.sagepub.com/lookup/doi/10.1177/2167479512471335
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2167-4795; 2167-4809
Appears in Collections:
JOG: Journalism and the Olympic Games Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWhannel, Garryen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-03T08:45:16Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-03T08:45:16Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationWhannel, G. (2013) 'Reflections on communication and sport: on mediatization and cultural analysis', Communication and Sport, 1 (1-2), pp.7-17.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn2167-4795-
dc.identifier.issn2167-4809-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/2167479512471335-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/295134-
dc.description.abstractIn this essay, Garry Whannel reflects on why research on media and sport has often been disdained by traditional academia and liberal intelligentsia. The first section argues that mediated sports are an important constituent part of popular culture, making its discourses worthy of scholarly study. The second section considers how early studies of mediated sport set in the tradition of British cultural studies opened the door to a inquiry that has grown in importance in both critical sport and media studies. The central section focuses on the complexities of “sport analysis, snobbery, and anti-intellectualism.” Considered here is the early and continued resistance to the study of media and sport and its derogatory stigmatization as a “Mickey Mouse” subject even in the face of excellent scholarship that has developed around the cultural and political analysis of sport. The article closes with suggestions for future work and ways to change narrative constructions of the field.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSage Journalsen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://com.sagepub.com/lookup/doi/10.1177/2167479512471335en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Communication and Sporten_GB
dc.subjectmediaen_GB
dc.subjectsporten_GB
dc.subjectresearchen_GB
dc.titleReflections on communication and sport: on mediatization and cultural analysisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCommunication and Sporten_GB
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