News, celebrity, and vortextuality: a study of the media coverage of the Michael Jackson verdict

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/295133
Title:
News, celebrity, and vortextuality: a study of the media coverage of the Michael Jackson verdict
Authors:
Whannel, Garry
Abstract:
This paper examines the transformation of news as a cultural commodity and a social process by the expansion in the range, volume, and circulation speed of media production. It introduces the concept of vortextuality and illustrates the vortextual effect with reference to the coverage of the verdict announcement in the trial of Michael Jackson. The nature of “news” has been transformed by new media technology, the erosion of the division between public and private, and the growth of a celebrity culture. during the last two decades the volume of information in circulation, and the speed of circulation and feedback of information have increased dramatically. These tendencies have given rise to an effect I term vortextuality, whereby major news stories have the power to dominate the news media to such an extent that all attention appears, temporarily, to be directed towards them. Editorials, cartoons, columns, features, phone-ins are all focused on the same issue. As with vortex-based natural phenomena, however, the vortextuality effect is unpredictable and short-lived. This paper illustrates some of the processes of vortextuality at work in the media coverage around the world of the announcement of the verdict in the Michael Jackson trial.
Citation:
Whannel, G. (2010) 'News, celebrity, and vortextuality: a study of the media coverage of the Michael Jackson verdict', Cultural Politics, 6 (1), pp.65-84.
Publisher:
Duke University Press
Journal:
Cultural Politics: an International Journal
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/295133
DOI:
10.2752/175174310X12549254318782
Additional Links:
http://openurl.ingenta.com/content/xref?genre=article&issn=1743-2197&volume=6&issue=1&spage=65
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1743-2197; 1751-7435
Appears in Collections:
JOG: Journalism and the Olympic Games Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWhannel, Garryen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-03T08:42:00Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-03T08:42:00Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationWhannel, G. (2010) 'News, celebrity, and vortextuality: a study of the media coverage of the Michael Jackson verdict', Cultural Politics, 6 (1), pp.65-84.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1743-2197-
dc.identifier.issn1751-7435-
dc.identifier.doi10.2752/175174310X12549254318782-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/295133-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the transformation of news as a cultural commodity and a social process by the expansion in the range, volume, and circulation speed of media production. It introduces the concept of vortextuality and illustrates the vortextual effect with reference to the coverage of the verdict announcement in the trial of Michael Jackson. The nature of “news” has been transformed by new media technology, the erosion of the division between public and private, and the growth of a celebrity culture. during the last two decades the volume of information in circulation, and the speed of circulation and feedback of information have increased dramatically. These tendencies have given rise to an effect I term vortextuality, whereby major news stories have the power to dominate the news media to such an extent that all attention appears, temporarily, to be directed towards them. Editorials, cartoons, columns, features, phone-ins are all focused on the same issue. As with vortex-based natural phenomena, however, the vortextuality effect is unpredictable and short-lived. This paper illustrates some of the processes of vortextuality at work in the media coverage around the world of the announcement of the verdict in the Michael Jackson trial.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDuke University Pressen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://openurl.ingenta.com/content/xref?genre=article&issn=1743-2197&volume=6&issue=1&spage=65en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Cultural Politics: an International Journalen_GB
dc.subjectnewsen_GB
dc.subjectcelebrityen_GB
dc.subjectvortextualityen_GB
dc.subjectMichael Jacksonen
dc.titleNews, celebrity, and vortextuality: a study of the media coverage of the Michael Jackson verdicten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCultural Politics: an International Journalen_GB
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