2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/295128
Title:
Winning and losing respect: narratives of identity in sport films
Authors:
Whannel, Garry
Abstract:
This essay examines sport films in terms of respect, identity and individualism. It suggests that a common narrative structure in films featuring sport based stories involves the winning, or sometimes losing, of respect. Success in narrative terms is not so much associated with sporting victory as in winning the respect of others. Through these narrative structures, issues of identity are explored. In particular, the narratives trace the ways in which characters respond to challenges by changing. In this sense these films are rooted in an ideology of competitive individualism which is a distinct product of capitalism as it developed in the United States of America. So while women, Jews, Afro-Americans and British Asian girls all find fulfilment through the narrative journey of these films, it tends to be within the terms of the competitive individualist ideology. Only where the concept of respect and its association with sport performance is challenged or questioned do sport films tend to raise more profound questions about the individual in society.
Citation:
Whannel, G. (2008) 'Winning and losing respect: narratives of identity in sport films', Sport in Society: cultures, commerce, media, politics, 11 (2-3), pp.195-208.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Sport in Society
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/295128
DOI:
10.1080/17430430701823422
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17430430701823422
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1743-0437; 1743-0445
Appears in Collections:
JOG: Journalism and the Olympic Games Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWhannel, Garryen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-03T08:28:06Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-03T08:28:06Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationWhannel, G. (2008) 'Winning and losing respect: narratives of identity in sport films', Sport in Society: cultures, commerce, media, politics, 11 (2-3), pp.195-208.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1743-0437-
dc.identifier.issn1743-0445-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17430430701823422-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/295128-
dc.description.abstractThis essay examines sport films in terms of respect, identity and individualism. It suggests that a common narrative structure in films featuring sport based stories involves the winning, or sometimes losing, of respect. Success in narrative terms is not so much associated with sporting victory as in winning the respect of others. Through these narrative structures, issues of identity are explored. In particular, the narratives trace the ways in which characters respond to challenges by changing. In this sense these films are rooted in an ideology of competitive individualism which is a distinct product of capitalism as it developed in the United States of America. So while women, Jews, Afro-Americans and British Asian girls all find fulfilment through the narrative journey of these films, it tends to be within the terms of the competitive individualist ideology. Only where the concept of respect and its association with sport performance is challenged or questioned do sport films tend to raise more profound questions about the individual in society.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17430430701823422en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Sport in Societyen_GB
dc.titleWinning and losing respect: narratives of identity in sport filmsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalSport in Societyen_GB
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