2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294988
Title:
Crossover of occupational stress in dual-career couples
Authors:
Crossfield, Sophie; Kinman, Gail ( 0000-0002-0130-1708 ) ; Jones, Fiona
Abstract:
This study considers the source, nature and direction of ‘crossover’ of occupational stressors and strains in a sample of 74 dual-career couples. It examines patterns and habits of discussion about work between partners and investigates the role of partner communication and job commitment in the crossover process. Contrary to previous research findings which suggest that the direction of crossover is predominantly from men to their female partners, positive relationships were found between women's work stressors and the anxiety and depression reported by their male partners. Only modest evidence of crossover from men to women was found. Work demands were linked to the crossover process for both men and women but, unlike the findings of previous studies, supportive features of the working environment failed to predict crossover between partners. The nature and frequency of marital communication about work was associated with crossover, as was job commitment and satisfaction. The implications of these findings for the psychological health and functioning of dual-career couples are discussed, and recommendations for future research that might further elucidate the crossover process are made.
Citation:
Crossfield, S., Kinman, G. and Jones, F. (2005) 'Crossover of occupational stress in dual-career couples', Community, Work & Family, 8(2), pp.211-232
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Community, Work & Family
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294988
DOI:
10.1080/13668800500049779
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13668800500049779
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1366-8803; 1469-3615
Appears in Collections:
Research Centre for Applied Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCrossfield, Sophieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJones, Fionaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-01T10:38:10Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-01T10:38:10Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationCrossfield, S., Kinman, G. and Jones, F. (2005) 'Crossover of occupational stress in dual-career couples', Community, Work & Family, 8(2), pp.211-232en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1366-8803-
dc.identifier.issn1469-3615-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13668800500049779-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/294988-
dc.description.abstractThis study considers the source, nature and direction of ‘crossover’ of occupational stressors and strains in a sample of 74 dual-career couples. It examines patterns and habits of discussion about work between partners and investigates the role of partner communication and job commitment in the crossover process. Contrary to previous research findings which suggest that the direction of crossover is predominantly from men to their female partners, positive relationships were found between women's work stressors and the anxiety and depression reported by their male partners. Only modest evidence of crossover from men to women was found. Work demands were linked to the crossover process for both men and women but, unlike the findings of previous studies, supportive features of the working environment failed to predict crossover between partners. The nature and frequency of marital communication about work was associated with crossover, as was job commitment and satisfaction. The implications of these findings for the psychological health and functioning of dual-career couples are discussed, and recommendations for future research that might further elucidate the crossover process are made.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13668800500049779en_GB
dc.subjectwork stressen_GB
dc.subjectdual-career couplesen_GB
dc.subjectcrossoveren_GB
dc.titleCrossover of occupational stress in dual-career couplesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCommunity, Work & Familyen_GB
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.