2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294512
Title:
Biomechanics of ankle instability. Part 1: reaction time to simulated ankle sprain
Authors:
Mitchell, Andrew C.S.; Dyson, Rosemary; Hale, Tudor; Abraham, Corinne
Abstract:
The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that ankles with functional instability will demonstrate slower muscular reaction times than their contralateral stable ankle (SA) and stable healthy controls to a simulated nonpathological ankle sprain mechanism. Results demonstrate a deficit (slower reaction time) in ankles with FAI when acting in support and when exposed to a simulated sprain compared to stable healthy controls. As a result of slower reaction times, acting to support the UA may put the contralateral SA at an increased risk of ankle sprain. This suggests that rehabilitation of a lateral ankle sprain should include strengthening the evertors (peroneals and EDL) at the subtalar joint and the dorsiflexors (TA and EDL) at the talocrural joint.
Citation:
Mitchell, A., Dyson, R., Hale, T. and Abraham, C. (2008) 'Biomechanics of Ankle Instability. Part 1: Reaction Time to Simulated Ankle Sprain', Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 40(8), pp. 1515-1521
Publisher:
American College of Sports Medicine
Journal:
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294512
DOI:
10.1249/MSS.0b013e31817356b6
Additional Links:
http://content.wkhealth.com/linkback/openurl?sid=WKPTLP:landingpage&an=00005768-200808000-00025
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0195-9131
Appears in Collections:
Applied Sport and Exercise Physiology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Andrew C.S.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDyson, Rosemaryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHale, Tudoren_GB
dc.contributor.authorAbraham, Corinneen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-25T14:07:52Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-25T14:07:52Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationMitchell, A., Dyson, R., Hale, T. and Abraham, C. (2008) 'Biomechanics of Ankle Instability. Part 1: Reaction Time to Simulated Ankle Sprain', Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 40(8), pp. 1515-1521en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0195-9131-
dc.identifier.doi10.1249/MSS.0b013e31817356b6-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/294512-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that ankles with functional instability will demonstrate slower muscular reaction times than their contralateral stable ankle (SA) and stable healthy controls to a simulated nonpathological ankle sprain mechanism. Results demonstrate a deficit (slower reaction time) in ankles with FAI when acting in support and when exposed to a simulated sprain compared to stable healthy controls. As a result of slower reaction times, acting to support the UA may put the contralateral SA at an increased risk of ankle sprain. This suggests that rehabilitation of a lateral ankle sprain should include strengthening the evertors (peroneals and EDL) at the subtalar joint and the dorsiflexors (TA and EDL) at the talocrural joint.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican College of Sports Medicineen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://content.wkhealth.com/linkback/openurl?sid=WKPTLP:landingpage&an=00005768-200808000-00025en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Medicine & Science in Sports & Exerciseen_GB
dc.subjectdominanceen_GB
dc.subjectligamenten_GB
dc.subjecttilten_GB
dc.subjectC600 Sports Scienceen_GB
dc.titleBiomechanics of ankle instability. Part 1: reaction time to simulated ankle sprainen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMedicine & Science in Sports & Exerciseen_GB
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