2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294160
Title:
Challenges for sustainability in cultures where regard for the future may not be present
Authors:
Crabbe, M. James C.
Abstract:
A concept of time depends upon both culture and linguistics, and one person’s future may be another person’s present. Temporal and spatial concepts are crucial to sustainability issues and a concept of “the future” may depend upon ethnicity, linguistic background, lifestyle, and life expectancy. Many currently threatened natural systems are in locations where the indigenous people have a linguistic and conceptual background very different from those in the so-called developed countries. One example is the Bajau people who live off the southeast coast of Sulawesi in Indonesia, close to highly endangered coral reefs. How can we connect the “future perspective” mismatch between Austronesian people like the Bajau and conservationists from developed countries who want to protect the reefs for future generations? Many challenges are ahead, not the least being a practical one of providing the right education for the Bajau to show how certain actions – for example, “no-take” fishing zones – can help achieve their aspirations. Perhaps even more important is the moral challenge of reassessing our own assumptions about worthwhile aspirations, about what is good for the Bajau – and similar people – and their rights and roles in determining the outcomes.
Citation:
Crabbe M.J.C. (2006) 'Challenges for sustainability in cultures where regard for the future may not be present', Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, 2(2),pp.57-61
Publisher:
ProQuest
Journal:
Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294160
Additional Links:
http://sspp.proquest.com/archives/vol2iss2/communityessay.crabbe.html
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1548-7733
Appears in Collections:
Environmental Monitoring Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCrabbe, M. James C.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-18T09:49:20Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-18T09:49:20Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationCrabbe M.J.C. (2006) 'Challenges for sustainability in cultures where regard for the future may not be present', Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, 2(2),pp.57-61en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1548-7733-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/294160-
dc.description.abstractA concept of time depends upon both culture and linguistics, and one person’s future may be another person’s present. Temporal and spatial concepts are crucial to sustainability issues and a concept of “the future” may depend upon ethnicity, linguistic background, lifestyle, and life expectancy. Many currently threatened natural systems are in locations where the indigenous people have a linguistic and conceptual background very different from those in the so-called developed countries. One example is the Bajau people who live off the southeast coast of Sulawesi in Indonesia, close to highly endangered coral reefs. How can we connect the “future perspective” mismatch between Austronesian people like the Bajau and conservationists from developed countries who want to protect the reefs for future generations? Many challenges are ahead, not the least being a practical one of providing the right education for the Bajau to show how certain actions – for example, “no-take” fishing zones – can help achieve their aspirations. Perhaps even more important is the moral challenge of reassessing our own assumptions about worthwhile aspirations, about what is good for the Bajau – and similar people – and their rights and roles in determining the outcomes.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherProQuesten_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://sspp.proquest.com/archives/vol2iss2/communityessay.crabbe.htmlen_GB
dc.subjectresource managementen_GB
dc.subjectconservationen_GB
dc.subjectcoral reefsen_GB
dc.subjectfishing communititesen_GB
dc.subjectsustainable developmenten_GB
dc.titleChallenges for sustainability in cultures where regard for the future may not be presenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalSustainability: Science, Practice, & Policyen_GB
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