Psychosocial factors and gender as predictors of symptoms associated with sick building syndrome

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294120
Title:
Psychosocial factors and gender as predictors of symptoms associated with sick building syndrome
Authors:
Griffin, Miriam; Kinman, Gail
Abstract:
Sick building syndrome (SBS) refers to a cluster of symptoms that typically worsen when employees are at work and diminish when they leave. A higher prevalence of symptoms is frequently observed among female employees. Although its aetiology is debated, evidence suggests that psychosocial factors might be at least as important as features of the working environment in predicting SBS symptoms. Utilizing a sample of 346 office-based employees (55 per cent female) located in five buildings with no known environmental problems, this study examined job control, job satisfaction, work-related mood and negative affectivity as predictors of self-reported symptoms typical of SBS. The role played by gender in symptom-reporting was also investigated. Findings revealed that employees who experienced more symptoms reported significantly less job control and job satisfaction and more work-related depression and anxiety. A positive relationship was also observed between symptom-reporting and negative affectivity. In contrast to previous research, no gender differences were observed in the prevalence of self-reported symptoms, but men and women differed in the predictors of symptoms and the proportion of variance explained. The findings suggest that demographic and psychosocial factors, as well as features of the objective physical environment, should be considered in future investigations of SBS. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Bedfordshire, UK
Citation:
Kinman, G. and Griffin, M. (2008), 'Psychosocial factors and gender as predictors of symptoms associated with sick building syndrome' Stress and Health, 24: 165–171. doi: 10.1002/smi.1175
Publisher:
John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.
Journal:
Stress and health
Issue Date:
11-Mar-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294120
PubMed Central ID:
10.1002/smi.1175
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/smi.1175/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Journal of the International Society for the Investigation of Stress
ISSN:
1532-3005
Appears in Collections:
Research Centre for Applied Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGriffin, Miriamen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-17T11:10:25Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-17T11:10:25Z-
dc.date.issued2008-03-11-
dc.identifier.citationKinman, G. and Griffin, M. (2008), 'Psychosocial factors and gender as predictors of symptoms associated with sick building syndrome' Stress and Health, 24: 165–171. doi: 10.1002/smi.1175en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1532-3005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/294120-
dc.descriptionJournal of the International Society for the Investigation of Stressen_GB
dc.description.abstractSick building syndrome (SBS) refers to a cluster of symptoms that typically worsen when employees are at work and diminish when they leave. A higher prevalence of symptoms is frequently observed among female employees. Although its aetiology is debated, evidence suggests that psychosocial factors might be at least as important as features of the working environment in predicting SBS symptoms. Utilizing a sample of 346 office-based employees (55 per cent female) located in five buildings with no known environmental problems, this study examined job control, job satisfaction, work-related mood and negative affectivity as predictors of self-reported symptoms typical of SBS. The role played by gender in symptom-reporting was also investigated. Findings revealed that employees who experienced more symptoms reported significantly less job control and job satisfaction and more work-related depression and anxiety. A positive relationship was also observed between symptom-reporting and negative affectivity. In contrast to previous research, no gender differences were observed in the prevalence of self-reported symptoms, but men and women differed in the predictors of symptoms and the proportion of variance explained. The findings suggest that demographic and psychosocial factors, as well as features of the objective physical environment, should be considered in future investigations of SBS. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJohn Wiley and Sons, Ltd.en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/smi.1175/abstract-
dc.subjectbuilding-related symptomsen_GB
dc.subjectjob-related mooden_GB
dc.subjectsick building syndromeen_GB
dc.titlePsychosocial factors and gender as predictors of symptoms associated with sick building syndromeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, University of Bedfordshire, UKen_GB
dc.identifier.journalStress and healthen_GB
dc.identifier.pmcid10.1002/smi.1175-
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