An examination of the relationships between trait emotional intelligence and health behaviour

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294111
Title:
An examination of the relationships between trait emotional intelligence and health behaviour
Authors:
Hart, Jacqui Ann; Kinman, Gail
Abstract:
Objective: There is some evidence that emotional intelligence (EI) is significantly related to mental, physical and social health (Extremera & Fernández-Berrocal, 2006). Moreover, although it has been suggested that EI is related to individual health-related behaviours, research in this field is sparse and has limitations. The aim of the present study was to examine inter-relationships between EI and both positive and negative health-related behaviours. Design: A cross-sectional, correlational design was utilised. Method: 139 participants (70 per cent female with a mean age of 39 years) completed a range of questionnaires. EI was measured by the Trait Meta-Mood Scale (Salovey, Mayer, Goldman, Turvey & Palfai, 1995), comprising mood clarity, attention and repair. Positive and negative health behaviours were measured by scales adapted from the Reported Health Behaviours Checklist (Prohaska, Leventhal, Leventhal & Keller, 1985) and the General Preventive Health Behaviours Checklist (Amir, 1987). Results: Significant positive correlations were observed between positive health behaviours and global EI (p<.05) and with two of the subscales, Clarity (p<.05) and Repair (p<.01). No significant relationships were found between global EI or any of its subscales and negative health behaviours. Conclusions: These findings suggest that future research might investigate aspects of EI as a possible mechanism through which positive health behaviours might be developed and maintained. Further, it is suggested that interventions based on cognitive behavioural therapy might be utilised to enhance people’s skills in the identification of positive and negative emotions by exploring more adaptive positive behavioural options (for example, exercise) rather than negative ones (such as substance abuse).
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Hart, J. & Kinman, G. (2008). 'An Examination of the Relationships Between Trait Emotional Intelligence and Health Behaviour'. Health psychology update 17 (2)
Publisher:
British Psychology Society
Journal:
Health psychology update
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294111
Additional Links:
http://shop.bps.org.uk/publications/publication-by-series/health-psychology-update-vol-17-no-2-2008.html
Type:
Conference papers, meetings and proceedings
Language:
en
ISSN:
0954-2027
Appears in Collections:
Research Centre for Applied Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHart, Jacqui Annen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-17T12:24:29Zen
dc.date.available2013-06-17T12:24:29Zen
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.citationHart, J. & Kinman, G. (2008). 'An Examination of the Relationships Between Trait Emotional Intelligence and Health Behaviour'. Health psychology update 17 (2)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0954-2027en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/294111en
dc.description.abstractObjective: There is some evidence that emotional intelligence (EI) is significantly related to mental, physical and social health (Extremera & Fernández-Berrocal, 2006). Moreover, although it has been suggested that EI is related to individual health-related behaviours, research in this field is sparse and has limitations. The aim of the present study was to examine inter-relationships between EI and both positive and negative health-related behaviours. Design: A cross-sectional, correlational design was utilised. Method: 139 participants (70 per cent female with a mean age of 39 years) completed a range of questionnaires. EI was measured by the Trait Meta-Mood Scale (Salovey, Mayer, Goldman, Turvey & Palfai, 1995), comprising mood clarity, attention and repair. Positive and negative health behaviours were measured by scales adapted from the Reported Health Behaviours Checklist (Prohaska, Leventhal, Leventhal & Keller, 1985) and the General Preventive Health Behaviours Checklist (Amir, 1987). Results: Significant positive correlations were observed between positive health behaviours and global EI (p<.05) and with two of the subscales, Clarity (p<.05) and Repair (p<.01). No significant relationships were found between global EI or any of its subscales and negative health behaviours. Conclusions: These findings suggest that future research might investigate aspects of EI as a possible mechanism through which positive health behaviours might be developed and maintained. Further, it is suggested that interventions based on cognitive behavioural therapy might be utilised to enhance people’s skills in the identification of positive and negative emotions by exploring more adaptive positive behavioural options (for example, exercise) rather than negative ones (such as substance abuse).en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBritish Psychology Societyen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://shop.bps.org.uk/publications/publication-by-series/health-psychology-update-vol-17-no-2-2008.htmlen
dc.titleAn examination of the relationships between trait emotional intelligence and health behaviouren
dc.typeConference papers, meetings and proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, University of Bedfordshireen_GB
dc.identifier.journalHealth psychology updateen_GB
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