Emotional labour and strain in "front-line" service employees: does mode of delivery matter?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294102
Title:
Emotional labour and strain in "front-line" service employees: does mode of delivery matter?
Authors:
Kinman, Gail ( 0000-0002-0130-1708 )
Abstract:
Purpose - Research suggests that "front-line" service jobs typically require emotional labour owing to the high levels of interpersonal interaction inherent in such work. Although emotional labour can be performed face-to-face (in person) or voice-to-voice (on the telephone), little is known about whether the type of emotional demands and the relationships with strain outcomes differ according to mode of delivery. The purpose of this paper is to research these issues. Design/methodology/approach - Relationships are assessed between three dimensions of emotional labour (emotional display rules, and the faking and suppression of emotions) and strain outcomes (psychological distress, work-life conflict and job satisfaction) in a sample of 124-cabin crew (face-to-face interaction) and 122 telesales agents (voice-to-voice interaction). The emotional labour dimensions that are significant predictors of strain outcomes for both groups are examined by multiple regression. Findings - No significant differences were observed between groups in mean levels of emotional labour variables. A greater proportion of variance in all types of strain was explained by the emotional labour components for participants who interact with customers face-to-face but these differences did not reach statistical significance. The emotional labour dimensions that predicted each strain outcome varied according to mode of delivery. Practical implications - Ways by which service sector organisations might counteract the potentially negative effects of performing emotional labour are discussed. Originality/value - The study provides some initial evidence that the impact of mode of delivery in emotion work is worthy of further investigation.
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Kinman, G. (2009) 'Emotional labour and strain in “front-line” service employees: Does mode of delivery matter?', Journal of Managerial Psychology, 24(2), pp.118 - 135.
Publisher:
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Journal:
Journal of Managerial Psychology
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294102
Additional Links:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=1771050&show=abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0268-3946
Appears in Collections:
Research Centre for Applied Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-17T09:30:07Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-17T09:30:07Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationKinman, G. (2009) 'Emotional labour and strain in “front-line” service employees: Does mode of delivery matter?', Journal of Managerial Psychology, 24(2), pp.118 - 135.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0268-3946-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/294102-
dc.description.abstractPurpose - Research suggests that "front-line" service jobs typically require emotional labour owing to the high levels of interpersonal interaction inherent in such work. Although emotional labour can be performed face-to-face (in person) or voice-to-voice (on the telephone), little is known about whether the type of emotional demands and the relationships with strain outcomes differ according to mode of delivery. The purpose of this paper is to research these issues. Design/methodology/approach - Relationships are assessed between three dimensions of emotional labour (emotional display rules, and the faking and suppression of emotions) and strain outcomes (psychological distress, work-life conflict and job satisfaction) in a sample of 124-cabin crew (face-to-face interaction) and 122 telesales agents (voice-to-voice interaction). The emotional labour dimensions that are significant predictors of strain outcomes for both groups are examined by multiple regression. Findings - No significant differences were observed between groups in mean levels of emotional labour variables. A greater proportion of variance in all types of strain was explained by the emotional labour components for participants who interact with customers face-to-face but these differences did not reach statistical significance. The emotional labour dimensions that predicted each strain outcome varied according to mode of delivery. Practical implications - Ways by which service sector organisations might counteract the potentially negative effects of performing emotional labour are discussed. Originality/value - The study provides some initial evidence that the impact of mode of delivery in emotion work is worthy of further investigation.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limiteden_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=1771050&show=abstract-
dc.subjectcall centresen_GB
dc.subjectcustomer service managementen_GB
dc.subjectface-to-face communicationsen_GB
dc.subjectindividual psychologyen_GB
dc.subjectsocial interactionen_GB
dc.titleEmotional labour and strain in "front-line" service employees: does mode of delivery matter?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, University of Bedfordshireen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Managerial Psychologyen_GB
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