Emotional labour, burnout and job satisfaction in UK teachers: the role of workplace social support

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294093
Title:
Emotional labour, burnout and job satisfaction in UK teachers: the role of workplace social support
Authors:
Kinman, Gail ( 0000-0002-0130-1708 ) ; Strange, Calista; Wray, Siobhan
Abstract:
Although teaching has been described as a profoundly emotional activity, little is known about the emotional demands faced by teachers or how this impacts on their well-being. This study examined relationships between ‘emotional labour’, burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment) and job satisfaction in a sample of UK teachers. Also examined was whether workplace social support moderated any relationships found between emotional labour and strain. The relationship between job experience and emotional labour was also investigated. Six hundred and twenty-eight teachers working in secondary schools in the UK completed questionnaires. Significant associations were observed between emotional labour and all outcomes, with a positive relationship found between emotional labour and personal accomplishment. Some evidence was found that social support mitigates the negative impact of emotional demands on emotional exhaustion, feelings of personal accomplishment and job satisfaction. More experienced teachers reported higher levels of emotional labour. Findings highlight the need for teacher-training programmes to raise awareness of the emotional demands of teaching and consider ways to enhance emotion regulation skills in experienced as well as recently qualified staff.
Affiliation:
Oxford Brookes University; University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Kinman, G., Wray, S. & Strange, C. (2011) 'Emotional labour, burnout and job satisfaction in UK teachers: The role of workplace social support', Educational Psychology, 31 (7), pp.843-856.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Educational Psychology
Issue Date:
26-Jul-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294093
DOI:
10.1080/01443410.2011.608650
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01443410.2011.608650#.VOcpGieb9Fs
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0144-3410
Appears in Collections:
Research Centre for Applied Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStrange, Calistaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWray, Siobhanen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-17T09:05:06Zen
dc.date.available2013-06-17T09:05:06Zen
dc.date.issued2011-07-26en
dc.identifier.citationKinman, G., Wray, S. & Strange, C. (2011) 'Emotional labour, burnout and job satisfaction in UK teachers: The role of workplace social support', Educational Psychology, 31 (7), pp.843-856.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0144-3410en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01443410.2011.608650en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/294093en
dc.description.abstractAlthough teaching has been described as a profoundly emotional activity, little is known about the emotional demands faced by teachers or how this impacts on their well-being. This study examined relationships between ‘emotional labour’, burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment) and job satisfaction in a sample of UK teachers. Also examined was whether workplace social support moderated any relationships found between emotional labour and strain. The relationship between job experience and emotional labour was also investigated. Six hundred and twenty-eight teachers working in secondary schools in the UK completed questionnaires. Significant associations were observed between emotional labour and all outcomes, with a positive relationship found between emotional labour and personal accomplishment. Some evidence was found that social support mitigates the negative impact of emotional demands on emotional exhaustion, feelings of personal accomplishment and job satisfaction. More experienced teachers reported higher levels of emotional labour. Findings highlight the need for teacher-training programmes to raise awareness of the emotional demands of teaching and consider ways to enhance emotion regulation skills in experienced as well as recently qualified staff.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01443410.2011.608650#.VOcpGieb9Fsen
dc.subjectemotional labouren_GB
dc.subjectburnouten_GB
dc.subjectsocial supporten_GB
dc.subjectteacher well-beingen_GB
dc.titleEmotional labour, burnout and job satisfaction in UK teachers: the role of workplace social supporten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentOxford Brookes Universityen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEducational Psychologyen_GB
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.