2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294074
Title:
The cost of caring? emotional labour, wellbeing and the clergy
Authors:
Kinman, Gail; McFall, Obrene; Rodriguez, Joanna
Abstract:
Although members of the clergy experience working conditions that have been associated with “emotional labour”, little is known about the impact of this aspect of the job role on wellbeing. This study examined relationships between emotional labour and psychological distress and intrinsic job satisfaction in 188 UK-based clergy. Also investigated were the potential moderating effects of social support and training in counselling skills. Findings revealed significant associations between emotional labour and both psychological distress and job satisfaction. Evidence was found that counselling training and a wider social network may protect clergy from the negative impact of emotional labour, but social network size may also be a risk factor for wellbeing. Further research should examine the impact of emotional labour on clergy, and the factors that might help them manage this more effectively.
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Kinman, G., McFall, O., & Rodriguez, J. (2011) 'The cost of caring? Emotional labour, wellbeing and the clergy' Pastoral Psychology, 60(5), 671-680.
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Pastoral Psychology
Issue Date:
1-Oct-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/294074
DOI:
10.1007/s11089-011-0340-0
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11089-011-0340-0
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1573-6679
Appears in Collections:
Research Centre for Applied Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcFall, Obreneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Joannaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-17T09:03:45Zen
dc.date.available2013-06-17T09:03:45Zen
dc.date.issued2011-10-01en
dc.identifier.citationKinman, G., McFall, O., & Rodriguez, J. (2011) 'The cost of caring? Emotional labour, wellbeing and the clergy' Pastoral Psychology, 60(5), 671-680.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1573-6679en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11089-011-0340-0en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/294074en
dc.description.abstractAlthough members of the clergy experience working conditions that have been associated with “emotional labour”, little is known about the impact of this aspect of the job role on wellbeing. This study examined relationships between emotional labour and psychological distress and intrinsic job satisfaction in 188 UK-based clergy. Also investigated were the potential moderating effects of social support and training in counselling skills. Findings revealed significant associations between emotional labour and both psychological distress and job satisfaction. Evidence was found that counselling training and a wider social network may protect clergy from the negative impact of emotional labour, but social network size may also be a risk factor for wellbeing. Further research should examine the impact of emotional labour on clergy, and the factors that might help them manage this more effectively.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11089-011-0340-0en
dc.subjectemotional labouren_GB
dc.subjectclergyen_GB
dc.subjectsocial supporten_GB
dc.subjectwellbeingen_GB
dc.titleThe cost of caring? emotional labour, wellbeing and the clergyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, University of Bedfordshireen_GB
dc.identifier.journalPastoral Psychologyen_GB
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.