Water pollutant fingerprinting tracks recent industrial transfer from coastal to inland China: a case study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/293947
Title:
Water pollutant fingerprinting tracks recent industrial transfer from coastal to inland China: a case study
Authors:
Zheng, Weiwei; Wang, Xia; Tian, Dajun; Jiang, Songhui; Andersen, Melvin E.; He, Genhsjeng; Crabbe, M. James C.; Zheng, Yuxin; Zhong, Yang; Qu, Weidong
Abstract:
In recent years, China’s developed regions have transferred industries to undeveloped regions. Large numbers of unlicensed or unregistered enterprises are widespread in these undeveloped regions and they are subject to minimal regulation. Current methods for tracing industrial transfers in these areas, based on enterprise registration information or economic surveys, do not work. The authors have developed an analytical framework combining water fingerprinting and evolutionary analysis to trace the pollution transfer features between water sources. We collected samples in Eastern China (industrial export) and Central China (industrial acceptance) separately from two water systems. Based on the water pollutant fingerprints and evolutionary trees, we traced the pollution transfer associated with industrial transfer between the two areas. The results are consistent with four episodes of industrial transfers over the past decade. The results also show likely types of the transferred industries - electronics, plastics, and biomedicines - that contribute to the water pollution transfer.
Citation:
Zheng, W., Wang, X., Tian, D., Jiang, S., Andersen, M.E., He, G., Crabbe, M.J.C., Zheng, Y., Zhong, Y. and Qu, W. (2013) 'Water pollutant fingerprinting tracks recent industrial transfer from coastal to inland China: A case study', Scientific Reports, 3, article number 1031
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/293947
DOI:
10.1038/srep01031
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/srep01031
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2045-2322
Appears in Collections:
Environmental Monitoring Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Weiweien_GB
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTian, Dajunen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Songhuien_GB
dc.contributor.authorAndersen, Melvin E.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHe, Genhsjengen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCrabbe, M. James C.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Yuxinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZhong, Yangen_GB
dc.contributor.authorQu, Weidongen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-13T15:16:41Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-13T15:16:41Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationZheng, W., Wang, X., Tian, D., Jiang, S., Andersen, M.E., He, G., Crabbe, M.J.C., Zheng, Y., Zhong, Y. and Qu, W. (2013) 'Water pollutant fingerprinting tracks recent industrial transfer from coastal to inland China: A case study', Scientific Reports, 3, article number 1031en_GB
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep01031-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/293947-
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, China’s developed regions have transferred industries to undeveloped regions. Large numbers of unlicensed or unregistered enterprises are widespread in these undeveloped regions and they are subject to minimal regulation. Current methods for tracing industrial transfers in these areas, based on enterprise registration information or economic surveys, do not work. The authors have developed an analytical framework combining water fingerprinting and evolutionary analysis to trace the pollution transfer features between water sources. We collected samples in Eastern China (industrial export) and Central China (industrial acceptance) separately from two water systems. Based on the water pollutant fingerprints and evolutionary trees, we traced the pollution transfer associated with industrial transfer between the two areas. The results are consistent with four episodes of industrial transfers over the past decade. The results also show likely types of the transferred industries - electronics, plastics, and biomedicines - that contribute to the water pollution transfer.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/srep01031en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Scientific Reportsen_GB
dc.subjectevolutionen_GB
dc.subjectchemistryen_GB
dc.subjectrisk factorsen_GB
dc.subjectenvironmental sciencesen_GB
dc.subjectwater pollutionen_GB
dc.titleWater pollutant fingerprinting tracks recent industrial transfer from coastal to inland China: a case studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen_GB
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